highlyeccentric: Demon's Covenant - Kitchen!fail - I saw you put rice in the toaster (Demon's Covenant - kitchen!fail)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
This is really a mash-up of two recipes, with the ultimate aim of providing Sufficient Nutrients in a single meal. The first is Jack Monroe's Spinach & lentil daal, from their second book; the second recipe is the Epicurious Indian spiced eggplant recipe. Both have been customised by me, for me. (This means they are white girl versions of indian food. Caveat lector)

Access and dietary notes )

What you need and what you do with it )
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
This is my go-to muffin recipe at the moment, but every time I've made it so far I've engineered it from a semi-related recipe for much richer and fancier lemon-berry-streusel muffins. It occurred to me that I could write my version down, and if I was going to write it down, why not here?

Dietary and accessibility notes: These are not vegan muffins, and unfortunately, I don't have the vegan baking expertise to suggest how they could become vegan. The recipe requires some stirring/whisking and spooning batter into muffin cups, but nothing so demanding that I feel my lack of an electric mixer, although it would certainly be possible to use one.

Ingredients )

Instructions )
highlyeccentric: Demon's Covenant - Kitchen!fail - I saw you put rice in the toaster (Demon's Covenant - kitchen!fail)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
Because I have made this twice lately and it's brilliant.

Accessibility and dietary notes )

What you need and what you do with it )

NB: i really can't estimate the serving numbers on this one. No matter how much I scale the recipe down it is always More Than Warranted. Maybe 5-6 as a side dish at these measurements.
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
A new deli has opened in my neighbourhood recently, and a couple of weeks ago I stopped in to check it out. As soon as I ordered my vegetable sandwich, the owner had me pegged as a vegetarian, and she spent the rest of my wait for my sandwich explaining the vegetarian options she already offered, and asking me for my suggestions. She tried to induce me to try some roasted red pepper-smoked gouda soup, but my takeout preferences run to things I can't make nearly as well myself (like amazing delicious sandwiches on massive sesame-challah buns) and soup doesn't fit that category. However, having determined that roasted red pepper-smoked gouda soup is a thing, I decided to make some.

I used this recipe as a guideline, and came out with some pretty delicious soup. If the prospect of grating up a bunch of fancy cheese and melting it into a pot of pureed veggies sounds like something you'd enjoy, this is definitely a soup for you.

Dietary note: This is largely vegetarian, depending on your tolerance for cheese that may use animal rennet. If you only eat rennet-free cheese and rennet-free smoked gouda is something you can get your hands on, not a problem. If not, I'm afraid the cheese is what makes this soup (although you might be able to get something similar in taste with a combination of liquid smoke and some kind of sharp white vegetarian cheese).

Accessibility note: This is a pretty easy soup chopping-wise; it's pureed, so no need to be finicky about chopping the veggies. It does require an immersion blender (or at least some kind of blender) and opening some jars, though.

Smoked Gouda, Roasted Pepper, and Tomato Soup )
redsnake05: Chocolate cake, looks delicious (Creative: Cake)
[personal profile] redsnake05
I have been getting more excited about very very traditional baking recently, and this delicious shortbread recipe is now a staple in my biscuit tin. It is ridiculously short and keeps extremely well.

Recipe and notes etc )
mathsnerd: ((die maus) pfannkuchen maus)
[personal profile] mathsnerd
This is a very nice soup for autumn, with its vibrant orange colour, and if you dial the ginger up like I did in the options below, you have a perfect meal for someone with a horrible, nasty cold who needs all the natural lurgy-fighting essences she can get. With the ginger at the normal level, in my experience, it's also a soup for kids.

Accessibility Notes: You will need to be able to chop veg, stir in a pot, and blend either with an immersion blender or by transferring to a blender and back to the pot.

Carrot Ginger Soup )

Enjoy!
killing_rose: Baby corvid, looking incredibly fluffy and adorable (fluffy raven)
[personal profile] killing_rose
So, only one member of my household had any idea what a buttermilk pie might be when I was playing with recipes this weekend.

All things considered, between that and the fact that we don't keep buttermilk in the house --hell, we don't even keep dairy milk in the main fridge--, I probably should have chosen another recipe. Instead I went, "Okay. Hopefully, y'all don't hate this."

First things first, of course, was proving that I could make buttermilk out of Silk almond milk. Somewhere, my very Southern father was horrified Saturday night and had no idea why.

Second was making a gluten free pie crust.

Third was making certain I knew how to get around the bit of flour used in the recipe itself.

So.

I used a gluten free pie crust mix that's made by a local company; it's sorghum flour and xanthan gum; I added the spectrum palm shortening, water, and sugar, froze it for about 20 minutes, oiled the pyrex pie plate, added the crust and then baked it for five minutes on 350.

This recipe will work with probably any crust, but I do recommend it's at least been in the oven for a few minutes before you add the filling.
Ingredients )

Directions )
jesse_the_k: Muppet's Swedish chef brandishes cleaver and spoon with rooster at side (grandiloquent cook is grandiloquent)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
First few times I tried collards I was mystified: why did people rave about these greens? Now I love them. They're substantial and gratifying with a nice tooth. The key insight was: ditch the ribs, slice thin, plenty of oil, cook 'em slow and long.
This makes enough for two people as a side dish )

Veg*ns use olive oil plus a medium diced onion instead of the bacon: sweat them on low for a long time so the onions get sweet and fragrant. Add more olive oil before you add the collards.
highlyeccentric: Demon's Covenant - Kitchen!fail - I saw you put rice in the toaster (Demon's Covenant - kitchen!fail)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
The recipe card at the store advertised this as "spanish" chorizo and vegetable soup, but I'm not convinced of its cultural authenticity.

Accessibility and dietary notes )

Ingredients and instructions )

Makes... about eight bowls, I think?
aquinasprime: (insane slytherin)
[personal profile] aquinasprime
There is nothing more impatient than a four-year-old who knows there are fresh cookies in the oven.

This is my mother's modified version of the old Nestle Toll House chocolate chip cookie recipe that comes on the bag of chocolate chips. When I say it makes cookies for a crowd, I have in the past made 7-8 dozen + from a single batch of this recipe. The dough can be kept frozen for up to 2 months (but it never lasts that long). This was a big favorite when I was in school, especially for bake sales.

recipe )
rosefox: A cheerful chef made out of ginger. (cooking)
[personal profile] rosefox
"At some point I must try Julia Child's chicken waterzooi," I said, and tonight we did, since we were dining with friends who weren't interested in fish. The creaminess of it reminded me of many years ago when Mi Cucina on Hudson & Jane was a good restaurant and served utterly sublime pollo y rajas con crema with wonderful crispy cubes of potato (if there's a name for those in Spanish, I don't know it), so crispy potatoes became our side dish. We drank Thomas Henry chardonnay, with which I promptly fell in love--glorious notes of caramel!--and sopped our bowls with French bread and it was very, very good.

Both recipes have been modified to be dairy-free. The potatoes are vegan; the waterzooi could be veganized pretty easily.

Crispy potatoes )

Chicken waterzooi )

Both recipes supposedly serve four, so we doubled them. They just barely served six. Fortunately the waterzooi is intensely rich and we had bread as well as potatoes, so no one went hungry.

Afterwards we went out for gelato. I am so full, my goodness.
shadowandflame: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowandflame
Randomly bought an eggplant the other day, and decided to do a tomato eggplant bake this morning since I have the day off. :) This is based on my vague memories of the last time I did an eggplant bake, plus some random ingredients I had in the fridge, but it turned out really well.

The recipe )
metawidget: a basket of vegetables: summer and winter squash, zucchini, tomatoes. (food)
[personal profile] metawidget

This recipe is sort of a mushrooms Bourguignon, fairly easy to make and good comfort food. The original is double the size and considerably sweeter; I cut out the brown sugar and added a little flour to thicken the sauce. It's about an hour from start to finish, but 45 minutes of that is letting it simmer down.

Mushrooms Berkeley

Adapted from Anna Thomas' The Vegetarian Epicure

the source uses the words 'dark and evil-looking'... )
rosefox: A cheerful chef made out of ginger. (cooking)
[personal profile] rosefox
Maybe ten years ago, maybe more, I had a bowl of waterzooi at Markt, a Belgian restaurant that at the time was in New York City's Meatpacking District. (It's moved up to Chelsea and they don't have waterzooi on the menu anymore.) It was one of those lifechanging culinary experiences. I eat seafood very rarely; I'd never encountered fish cooked with milk before. The broth was silky, the fish delicate and flaky, the strands of julienned vegetables eminently slurpable. Since then I've had many a creamy chowder, but none came close to the sublime richness of waterzooi, which incorporates both egg yolks and heavy cream (and, in Markt's version, lobster--definitely not traditional, but so delicious!).

On Tuesday we inaugurated our fabulous new blender by making cashew cream (pour boiling water over cashews, soak for one hour, drain, blend with cold water to desired consistency; we blended in a sauteed diced shallot for extra flavor). We made it quite thick and had a lot left over after making a really excellent pasta alfredo, so I'd been thinking about how to use it. Today I mixed some with water, leftover mashed potatoes, nutmeg, and thyme for the best creamy potato soup I've ever had. That made me think of chowder, which made me think of waterzooi. I hunted up a recipe that called for fish (though at some point I must try Julia Child's chicken waterzooi) and we set about adapting it for my dairy-free, low-salt diet.

Ingredients and recipe )

This recipe has a great cooking rhythm. There's just the right amount of time for cubing the fish and chopping the parsley as the vegetables cook, and for loading the dishwasher and separating the eggs as the fish simmers. It smells fantastic while it cooks, and one bowlful is a perfect meal. Even though we used low-sodium broth, it needed just the barest touch of salt to make the flavors pop. The two of us had a serving each, and the third serving is sitting in the fridge, where I suspect the flavors will marry gloriously.

It would be very easy to veganize: no egg yolks, more cashew cream to compensate, veg broth instead of chicken broth, tofu instead of fish. Maybe some day I'll try that. The vegetables could also be varied from the classic mirepoix; as I recall, the dish at Markt had long strands of zucchini and red bell pepper. Lemongrass, ginger, and a dash of hot sauce would give it a lovely Thai flavor, perfect served over rice instead of bread. It's a superbly adaptable recipe. I look forward to playing around with it.
kaberett: A pomegranate, with eyes and mouth drawn onto masking tape and applied (pomegranate)
[personal profile] kaberett
I spend a fair bit of my time at the moment cooking in a group where the dietary restrictions are (1) vegetarian (2) dairy-free (3) gluten-free (4) cane sugar-free.

And, well, cake is nice.

So I took my standard recipe, and we adapted it.

Standard ingredients. )

The modified version goes like this:

300g dark chocolate
200g soya Pure (or other hard or semi-hard fat)
5 eggs
250ml agave syrup
1 tsp vanilla
300g hazelnut meal
pinch of salt
raspberries

Pre-heat oven to 180degC.
Melt chocolate and fat together (either in a heat-proof bowl over simmering water, or in the microwave).
Beat eggs, agave syrup, vanilla (and any booze you want to use) together until thick.
Pour the melted chocolate mixture into the egg mixture and stir thoroughly.
Add the hazelnut flour and the salt and mix thoroughly.
Scatter raspberries liberally across the bottom of your desired baking pan (I tend to go for large rectangular pans, ceramic if I can get them) and stick in the oven for about 30 minutes. If at any point it starts to burn, cover with a sheet of tin foil.

Notes
This was our first attempt at this particular version of the modifications, and next time I'll probably either up the hazelnut meal a little more, or ditch one of the eggs. I'll also be rather more liberal with the vanilla, because the roasted hazelnut flour we used needed a little more of a boost than it ended up getting with these quantities.
Another excellent variant is halving and coring pears, filling the hollow with brown sugar, placing them cut-side-down in the baking tray, and using almond meal & cinnamon/nutmeg/etc in the batter.
feuervogel: (food)
[personal profile] feuervogel
(Or lazy-ass lasagna.)

Serves 4.

You will need:
1/2 lb pasta (penne, rigatoni, fusilli/rotini, bowties, etc. Not spaghetti, angel hair, etc.)
16 oz jar pasta sauce (one you like)
15 oz tub ricotta
6-8 oz mozzarella, shredded

8x8 baking dish, sprayed with non-stick spray

Step 1: Cook 1/2 lb pasta as directed on package. Drain.
Step 2: Return pasta to pot.
Step 3: Pour approximately half your pasta sauce into the pot with the pasta. Stir.
Step 4: Spoon approximately half your ricotta into the pot with the pasta and sauce. Stir until thoroughly mixed. (Sauce may appear unpleasant at this stage.)
Step 5: Dump contents of pot evenly into baking dish.
Step 6: Cover with shredded mozzarella.
Step 7: Bake in preheated 375-degree oven for 25-30 minutes, or until cheese is bubbly.

This can be made vegan by substituting soft or silken tofu for the ricotta and your favorite cheese substitute for the mozzarella.

You can easily double the recipe for larger groups. Use a 9x13 baking dish instead. This is my go-to potluck dish if I'm pressed for time.

(crossposted from my journal)
aquinasprime: (Default)
[personal profile] aquinasprime
On the menu tonight (and a frequent quick dinner in our house): Dijon coated pan-seared pork chop with ranch rice. We started making this when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes and it worked well for me.

Read more... )
delladea: (Default)
[personal profile] delladea
I've been introducing more vegetarian nights into our weekly menus to save some money. I found this coconut lentil soup recipe and modified it based on my tastes and what I had on hand. The result was a yummy, thick curry that my carnivore husband had to have seconds and thirds of. It gets even better after sitting in the 'fridge overnight.

My Modified Recipe )

We ate this with some curried collard greens and gluten-free naan. I highly recommend the yummy bread for dipping, but it's pretty good all by itself too. We got four large servings out of this recipe, enough for dinner last night and for both of us to have it for lunch the next day.
redsnake05: Chopping an onion (Creative: Cooking)
[personal profile] redsnake05
So, it's autumn here where I live, and a Snake's thoughts turn to carbohydrates. I had the urge to make dumplings, so I kind of half-invented dumplings cooked potsticker style but with a vaguely Eastern European-ish flavour. Precise, I know.

This recipe is vegetarian, and vegan if made with soy (or nut etc) milk and oil

Recipe, such as it is, under the cut )

Now, the questions. I am sure many of you have experience with dumplings, while I am very much a beginner. Tell me, what is a good way to wrap up your fillings so that there is not a huge wodge of dumpling on the top, and also so they don't fall apart. I kind of wrapped mine up like an origami envelope, but I feel I am missing something. Second, we do not routinely eat dumplings where I live, but I love and adore them. What are some other inventive ways of filling and cooking them? (I'm vegetarian, but feel free to include your favourite meat recipes, I will still read them with interest)

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