feuervogel: (food)
[personal profile] feuervogel
1 large or 1.5 med onions, diced (about 2 cups)
1 15-oz can diced tomatoes with chilies
1 28-oz can chunky tomato sauce
3 Tbsp molasses
~1 lb sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped small
~6 oz canned pumpkin
~1/2 package Quorn grounds
1 bottle porter beer (optional)
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp chili powder

1. Saute the onions in olive oil until translucent. (Optional; I prefer my onions cooked more than they get in a crock pot.)
2. Combine all ingredients in slow cooker and cook on high 3-4 hours or until done. (Spice quantities are estimates; adjust to taste.) (I assume you could do it longer on low.)

Serve with pumpkin spoon bread. (This is why there's a remnant of canned pumpkin in the chili, you see.) Bake the spoon bread toward the last hour of cooking, and it'll be nice and hot in your bowl.

(xposted from my journal)
lizcommotion: Spongebob's pet snail Gary wearing a chef's hat (spongebob gary chef)
[personal profile] lizcommotion
I may have impulse bought a 4 lb. bag of quinoa from Costco the other week. Today I felt comfortable enough to try using quinoa instead of couscous in a highly butchered version of the way my Libyan mother-in-law cooks it. (Hers involves lamb, and more vegetables that I didn't have on hand, and probably some other things I don't know. It's delicious.)

The most important part of this recipe is a spice mixture called b'zaar. There are probably different ways of making it (just as there are different ways of making any curry powder.) If you have the ingredients, I highly recommend making some and using it in things like lentils, couscous, etc. It's nommy. However, in a pinch you could probably substitute another pre-made curry powder.

B'zaar (Libyan Curry Mix)
Read more... )

Libyan Style Quinoa
Read more... )

finished cooking photo )
killing_rose: Baby corvid, looking incredibly fluffy and adorable (fluffy raven)
[personal profile] killing_rose
So, only one member of my household had any idea what a buttermilk pie might be when I was playing with recipes this weekend.

All things considered, between that and the fact that we don't keep buttermilk in the house --hell, we don't even keep dairy milk in the main fridge--, I probably should have chosen another recipe. Instead I went, "Okay. Hopefully, y'all don't hate this."

First things first, of course, was proving that I could make buttermilk out of Silk almond milk. Somewhere, my very Southern father was horrified Saturday night and had no idea why.

Second was making a gluten free pie crust.

Third was making certain I knew how to get around the bit of flour used in the recipe itself.

So.

I used a gluten free pie crust mix that's made by a local company; it's sorghum flour and xanthan gum; I added the spectrum palm shortening, water, and sugar, froze it for about 20 minutes, oiled the pyrex pie plate, added the crust and then baked it for five minutes on 350.

This recipe will work with probably any crust, but I do recommend it's at least been in the oven for a few minutes before you add the filling.
Ingredients )

Directions )
rosefox: A cheerful chef made out of ginger. (cooking)
[personal profile] rosefox
Tonight I made faux-Moroccan chicken for myself and [personal profile] xtina, based on a Cook's Illustrated recipe that I modified fairly heavily for our various dietary restrictions. It was mild and savory-sweet and delicious. I'll definitely be making this again.

Modifications in case you want to try the original recipe: I used unsalted broth rather than low-sodium, diced raw carrots instead of a can of diced tomatoes, and dates instead of dried apricots. Instead of spicing it up with garam masala I measured in cumin, coriander, and cardamom. I put in half an onion instead of a whole one, and three cloves of garlic rather than four. I left out the suggested 2 Tbsp minced fresh cilantro.

Incidentally, Cook's claims this takes 30 minutes, including prep. They lie. From when I started prep to when I served dinner was almost exactly 1.5 hours. I suppose there are ways I could have been more efficient, but I have a hard time picturing this taking less than an hour.

Soi-disant Moroccan chicken tagine with carrots, chickpeas, and dates )
rosefox: A cheerful chef made out of ginger. (cooking)
[personal profile] rosefox
"At some point I must try Julia Child's chicken waterzooi," I said, and tonight we did, since we were dining with friends who weren't interested in fish. The creaminess of it reminded me of many years ago when Mi Cucina on Hudson & Jane was a good restaurant and served utterly sublime pollo y rajas con crema with wonderful crispy cubes of potato (if there's a name for those in Spanish, I don't know it), so crispy potatoes became our side dish. We drank Thomas Henry chardonnay, with which I promptly fell in love--glorious notes of caramel!--and sopped our bowls with French bread and it was very, very good.

Both recipes have been modified to be dairy-free. The potatoes are vegan; the waterzooi could be veganized pretty easily.

Crispy potatoes )

Chicken waterzooi )

Both recipes supposedly serve four, so we doubled them. They just barely served six. Fortunately the waterzooi is intensely rich and we had bread as well as potatoes, so no one went hungry.

Afterwards we went out for gelato. I am so full, my goodness.
rosefox: A spark crossing a spark gap with the word "aha!". (aha!)
[personal profile] rosefox
I was never a big cheese fan even before I cut dairy out of my diet, but one of the few cheeses I really miss is Gruyere. It's creamy and nutty and earthy and rich and I used to use it for basically everything. One of my long-held hopes has been to find a way to make a vegan Gruyère-style sauce, but all the recipes I've seen have been long and complicated and involved nooch, which I really dislike, so I'd mostly given up.

Tonight I was Googling cheeseless pizza recipes and saw a potato pizza recipe (which sounds really yummy and I will definitely make it another time). That got me thinking about potato soups and how a really thick potato soup wouldn't be all that different from melted cheese if you flavored it right... it's goopy, it browns on top when you heat it, and the base is almost flavorless and easy to mess around with.

An hour later--including time it took to run out to the store--I had created the best vegan "cheese" sauce I've ever had in my life. It's so simple I'm not even going to cut-tag it.

Ingredients:
1 large Idaho potato (would probably be even better with Yukon Golds but my grocery didn't have them)
1/8 cup unsalted roasted cashews
Olive oil
Nutmeg
Salt

Tools:
Small pot, strainer, bowl, blender or stick blender

Peel the potato and cut it into small chunks. Place in a small pot with the cashews and add cold water to cover. Boil until very thoroughly cooked. Place the strainer over the bowl and pour in the potatoes and cashews, reserving the cooking water. Put the potatoes and cashews in the blender, or back in the pot if you're using a stick blender. Add in 1/2 cup of cooking water and blend at high speed until very creamy. Add a drizzle of olive oil, nutmeg, and salt to taste, and blend again. If you like nooch, try adding a pinch; it would probably give it a bit of extra depth. Run through the strainer a second time if there are chunks of nuts that the blender didn't catch.

I made a mini pizza with the "cheese", arugula, and salami, and it was superb: browned on top, still gooey underneath. It would work well on potatoes (that sounds sort of cannibalistic, doesn't it?) or pasta or broccoli--anything you'd make gratinée, basically. Adjust the flavorings to make something closer to cheddar (paprika? cider vinegar? miso paste? mess around and find what works) and it would be killer on nachos. The texture is great for dipping chips or crackers or veggies or slices of apple and pear. If you want to be adventurous, try treating it like curds and see if you can make a solid block of "cheese" out of it! I'll be curious to see what the texture's like after I store it in the fridge.

The major downside of potato "cheese" over soy/nut versions is that it doesn't have much protein. The major upside is that people with soy allergies can eat it! And it is so, so simple to make. Enjoy!
rosefox: A cheerful chef made out of ginger. (cooking)
[personal profile] rosefox
Maybe ten years ago, maybe more, I had a bowl of waterzooi at Markt, a Belgian restaurant that at the time was in New York City's Meatpacking District. (It's moved up to Chelsea and they don't have waterzooi on the menu anymore.) It was one of those lifechanging culinary experiences. I eat seafood very rarely; I'd never encountered fish cooked with milk before. The broth was silky, the fish delicate and flaky, the strands of julienned vegetables eminently slurpable. Since then I've had many a creamy chowder, but none came close to the sublime richness of waterzooi, which incorporates both egg yolks and heavy cream (and, in Markt's version, lobster--definitely not traditional, but so delicious!).

On Tuesday we inaugurated our fabulous new blender by making cashew cream (pour boiling water over cashews, soak for one hour, drain, blend with cold water to desired consistency; we blended in a sauteed diced shallot for extra flavor). We made it quite thick and had a lot left over after making a really excellent pasta alfredo, so I'd been thinking about how to use it. Today I mixed some with water, leftover mashed potatoes, nutmeg, and thyme for the best creamy potato soup I've ever had. That made me think of chowder, which made me think of waterzooi. I hunted up a recipe that called for fish (though at some point I must try Julia Child's chicken waterzooi) and we set about adapting it for my dairy-free, low-salt diet.

Ingredients and recipe )

This recipe has a great cooking rhythm. There's just the right amount of time for cubing the fish and chopping the parsley as the vegetables cook, and for loading the dishwasher and separating the eggs as the fish simmers. It smells fantastic while it cooks, and one bowlful is a perfect meal. Even though we used low-sodium broth, it needed just the barest touch of salt to make the flavors pop. The two of us had a serving each, and the third serving is sitting in the fridge, where I suspect the flavors will marry gloriously.

It would be very easy to veganize: no egg yolks, more cashew cream to compensate, veg broth instead of chicken broth, tofu instead of fish. Maybe some day I'll try that. The vegetables could also be varied from the classic mirepoix; as I recall, the dish at Markt had long strands of zucchini and red bell pepper. Lemongrass, ginger, and a dash of hot sauce would give it a lovely Thai flavor, perfect served over rice instead of bread. It's a superbly adaptable recipe. I look forward to playing around with it.
jesse_the_k: Muppet's Swedish chef brandishes cleaver and spoon with rooster at side (grandiloquent cook is grandiloquent)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
[personal profile] sasha_feather came over for lunch last month, and we created NOM soup! I am immodestly proud of my soup summoning ways! It's perfect for winter since it doesn't require freshies. It even got a thumbs' up from the better beet bureau, aka [personal profile] were_duck


Four-Way Root Vegetable Soup
SERVES: Four as a main course, six or eight as soup course

TOOLS
One burner
8 quart stock pot (the soup is only four quarts but it's much easier if you've got plenty of room to stir)
Tablespoon measure
One cup measure
Great sharp knife
(Immersion blender/food processor/blender/potato masher+strong arms) see note A
(Ladle)

PREP
measure:
One tablespoon cumin powder

mince:
Fresh ginger root big as your thumb (or more)
Two fat cloves of garlic (or more)
One small onion

pick stalks from, wash thoroughly, and drain:
Large handful fresh cilantro (Chinese parsley)

peel off skin and dice in half-inch cubes:
Two medium turnips
Two medium carrots
Two medium sweet potatoes
Two medium beets (see note B)

Mix
1 tablespoon Better than Bouillon Chicken Base (see note C)
1 cup boiling water
stir vehemently until base is dissolved

ASSEMBLY
Drizzle two tablespoons of olive oil (or whatever oil you prefer) in your soup pot
Heat on medium until fragrant (or you see the heat waves)

Stir in minced ginger, garlic, and onion thoroughly to coat with olive oil. Turn down to medium-low, stir frequently, and keep an eye on it so it caramelizes instead of burning (around 10 minutes)

Stir in diced root vegetables to coat. Cover and check every five minutes, stir if it makes you feel better (it does it for me). After they've joined in, cook for another 15 minutes.

Add in the bouillon-water mix, then three more cups water

It should come to the boil in around 8 minutes. Cover, turn down to low, and clean the kitchen for forty minutes.

This soup is tasty no matter how you serve it.

For sensuous delight, puree it, and it's transformed into gourmet orange fog. Serve in large bowls generously decorated with cilantro leaves.


Variations
My original plan was to add around one-half cup of coconut milk right before serving, but after I tasted the puree, I realized it was thick and creamy all on its own. But if you're feeling the need for coconut milk, or heavy cream, or sour cream, this soup would be an excellent place to fold some in. For creamy + protein, some soft tofu in the puree stage would do nicely.

The root-vegetable proportions when mixed with 4 cups of liquid were perfect, and I'd leave them alone. To satisfy my unending protein hankerings, I sauteed 1/2 lb of pork tenderloin dice and plopped them in to the soup as we were about to eat. Let me know if you have other ideas!



NOTES &c
A. Puree for heavenly texture.
I'm fortunate to have an immersion blender, which means I can puree something in place, without having to lift and pour hot heavy soup from a pot to a blender and back. But then my stock pot is non-stick, so I can't do it in place. But! I had [personal profile] sasha_feather over for lunch, and she did the heavy lifting. If you use a blender/food processor, you'll probably have to split the liquid into three portions.

B. Beet Peeling Frustration
I can't peel raw beets without gouging myself a lot. This method works but is a pain, so I welcome suggestions.
1. Snip off the greens one inch above the bellybutton
2. Drop beets in boiling water for five minutes
3. Pick them out of the water with the stem handles
4. Drop beets in ice cold water for five minutes
5. Grab the peeler and go

C. Better than Bouillon
This soup base (an aromatic, moist mix with the texture of toothpaste) is truly all that and a slice of coconut creme pie. They come in scores of flavors and a wonderful variety of containers, from an 8 oz home size to five-gallon plastic barrels. Yes, gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan, also chicken, ham, mushroom I can't remember them all.
acelightning: shiny purple plate with cartoon flatware (eats03)
[personal profile] acelightning
This is a clear, syrupy caramel sauce which goes well on ice cream, cheesecake, plain cake, filled dessert crepes - almost anything you'd want caramel sauce on, although intensely chocolate things tend to overwhelm it. I call it "double serendipity" because of two "mistakes" I made that turned it from a fairly basic caramel syrup into something with a deep, intriguing flavor.

The first mistake was that I put a dollop of Lyle's Golden Syrup(*) in at the beginning. The cookbook I was looking at had two recipes for caramel sauce, a clear one and one made with cream, and they were on facing pages. The recipes started out the same, but the cream sauce called for golden syrup. When I realized my mistake, I figured it wouldn't make any difference in the end, and it would give it more flavor.

The second mistake I made was to cook the first batch too long; when it cooled, it wasn't spoonable. I had to add more water and boil it some more to get the proper consistency. I had added the flavorings at the end of the first cooking process, which is normal, but they got thoroughly boiled when I re-cooked the mixture. The taste was ambrosial! The second time I made it, I cooked it the right amount of time, and added the liquor and vanilla at the end again... and it was just rum-flavored caramel sauce, tasty enough, but nothing special. Somehow adding the flavorings before the final boiling cooks off the raw alcohol taste and makes everything meld together into a uniquely delicious flavor. (And one of these days I'm going to try adding a bit of sea salt.)
DOUBLE SERENDIPITY CARAMEL SAUCE

1 cup granulated sugar [200 g caster sugar]
1/4 cup [60 ml] water
1 very heaping tablespoonful of Lyle's Golden Syrup(*)
Have ready by the stove:
1 cup [240 ml] very hot water
3 tablespoons [45 ml] dark rum (I use Appleton's Jamaica Rum, which is very flavorful)
1 tablespoon [15 ml] pure vanilla extract

Place the sugar, the smaller amount of water, and the syrup in a heavy saucepan with a capacity of at least 1 quart [1 liter]. Cook and stir over moderately high heat until everything is thoroughly dissolved, then stop stirring and watch it until it turns a deep golden color, but don't let it get too dark or it will start to taste bitter. Remove the pan from the head and slowly and carefully add the larger amonut of water - it will boil up in a great hissing, bubbling fuss. Stir a bit, then add the rum and vanilla, which will probably bubble up a little more. Return the pot to the stove, reduce the heat a little, and stir until everything is dissolved again. Bring it back to the boil and stop stirring. Boil it until it has reduced to 1 cup [240 ml] in volume; I periodically pour it into the heatproof cup I measured the water in, and then pour it back into the pan if it needs to cook more. When it's done, let it cool in the heatproof cup until it's just warm, then pour it into a jar with a lid. Store, covered, at room temperature. (If your room is chilly, after a couple of days the syrup may start to form crystals around the edges; if they bother you, reheat it gently while stirring.)

(*) Lyle's Golden Syrup is a British product that is now found in many US supermarkets. It's "refiner's syrup", the thick, golden, slightly brown-sugar flavored syrup that's left at the end of the sugar-refining process. It not only adds color and flavor, it helps prevent candies and sauces from crystallizing.
red_trillium: cartoon cat that says "I love cats but can't eat a whole one" (Default)
[personal profile] red_trillium
I'm cross posting this from my journal. I made the recipe & it turned out good despite making some mistakes! If you have food allergies or preferences you may be able to do some substitutions. I've had a couple people comment about corn allergies & the possibility of using tapioca starch. The ingredients are minimal so if you experiment and a batch doesn't quite turn out you don't have a lot invested.

My comments & changes are in itallics in the body of the recipe.


(Cross posted entry)

I came across a recipe last night and it sounded easy enough so I gave it a go this morning. Baking: How to try to destress on a weekend. This came out of the Countdown store's "Indulge" magazine that has recipes and product info. I think it's the most recent one as it's a 2011 one and has midwinter recipes in it (no date on the darned thing). The recipe is called Vanilla Marshmallow Stars, but for reasons about to become apparent I'll call it something else.

This would make a perfect, low-cost and quick gift idea. You can make them simple or you can go a bit more on the fancy side for flavours. You can package them in cellophane or a nice box or tin on their own or couple them with a box of Fairtrade hot cocoa mix & a nice mug or put it together with graham crackers (or vanilla or other simple, plain cookies) & a bar of chocolate & instructions. Because you control what goes in these you can experiment to adapt it to your dietary restrictions. Could be a gluten free recipe but check your corn flour (corn starch) to be sure none has snuck into there.

The best thing for me is not only is it quick and easy, but I have flubbed the recipe and they have still come out yummy.

Homemade Marshmallows, or LoveMallows
Total work time is about 30 to 40 minutes (depending) & total time before eating/serving is about 1 hr 30 min to 1 hr 40 mins.

Supposedly makes 16 but depends on the size you cut and how thick you spread it.

Ingredients
-Olive Oil, to grease (I messed up and didn't use this, no harm done).
-1/4 cup water
-2 teaspoons gelatine powder (I don't know if there is a vegetarian version to gelatine, if so you might need to adjust the amount if it gives a harder/softer set)
-1/2 vanilla bean, split lengthwise (or you can use flavours that you would use in baking: ie--1/2 to 1 tsp vanilla or lemon or .....)
-1/3 cup caster sugar (or super fine sugar, I wonder if you can also use honey or other non-sugar sweeeteners, may need some experimentation to get the texture & set right)
-cornflour (cornstarch) to dust (approx 1/3 cup and you can also add about 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon or just a bit less of a spice--I used ground ginger)

Brush a baking tray with oil to grease (this is the part I missed & did something else, didn't seem to make a difference to the finished product). Line with non-stick baking paper.

Place the water in a small sauce pan. Sprinkle with the gelatine & set aside to soften for 1 minute.

Scrape the seeds from the vanilla pod (or add flavour to the water and gelatine mix). Add the sugar (or other sweetener??). Place over low heat and stir until the gelatine and sugar dissolve. (Another part of the instructions says this should be simmering but I didn't see that and mine wasn't, didn't seem to have any ill effect but you want to be sure your gelatine is dissolved.)

Transfer the mix to a large bowl. Use an electric beater and beat for 10 minutes or until light, thick and fluffy. (Note: Don't overwhip or go too long as the gelatine then starts to set and you can't spread it well. Yeah, guess what else I did wrong in this recipe....)

Spread the thickened mixture over the prepared tray to form a 2cm thick (about the width of your thumbnail or so) and 16cm square. Smooth the surface. Set aside for 1 hour or until set. (I just put mine on the counter, it doesn't say anything about the fridge and this worked fine)

Lightly dust a sheet of non-stick baking paper with cornflour. Turn the marshmallow onto the prepared paper. Lightly dust the top of the marshmallow with cornflour. (Yeah, did something different here too, not a big deal, whatever works for you!)

Use a 3.5cm shaped pastry cutter (or a sharp knife) dipped in cornflour to cut 16 stars (or squares) from the marshmallow.


The directions don't say how to store or how long, I'm keeping mine in a airtight container and if it lasts a week I'll be lucky! :) I made lemon flavoured 'mallows with ground ginger. They're my "sorry you don't feel well" 'mallows since I wasn't feeling well today. I think next time I'll try to cut back the sugar and put some honey in for lemon-ginger-honey ones.

Another gift idea would be to make strawberry, vanilla, coffee, almond, ?? flavoured ones and dip them in melted chocolate. YUM. I also want to try to use one of my herbal fruit-infusion teas (like the Pineapple Passion from Aaah!Tea), make a very strong brew in the 1/3 cup of water and use that as a light flavour instead of the ones I use for baking.

Faux Pho

Apr. 4th, 2011 09:49 pm
starfish: Teal'c in foodservice hat - caption "Would you like fries with that?" (Fries)
[personal profile] starfish
This was dinner tonight. I sort of made it up based on a couple of pho recipes I looked at, modified to fit the time I had available. It was extraordinarily tasty. My quantities may not be your quantities; I wanted plenty extra for Osirus to have as leftovers - he is under the weather and will benefit from soup this week. This made a LOT of soup.

Ingredients )

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