jjhunter: Watercolor purple ruffled monster with mouthful of raw vegetables looks exceedingly self-pleased (veggie monster)
[personal profile] jjhunter
Cheap, easy, stores well, and can be jazzed up with further additions to vary latter servings - this recipe is one of my fallback staples.

ingredients )

Instructions:
Heat oil in heavy-bottomed pot (you'll need a lid later) and saute onion and garlic until translucent. Add ginger, tumeric and curry powder and saute a few minutes longer. (Can add more oil if necessary.) Add rice and saute for a few more minutes to coat the rice. Add the lentils, stock, raisins, and sunflower seeds, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 25 minutes.

Excellent served with yogurt, or with Waldorf salad.

Extras my mom recommends:
Would be good with butternut squash...roasted in chunks (with parsnips perhaps? ) or bake the squash, scoop it out and whip it with a bit of orange juice and nutmeg. Saute some dark greens (chard, spinach) with olive oil, garlic, pinenuts as a second vegetable.
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
For Christmas, my parents gave me Karen Page, The Vegetarian Flavor Bible, which is essentially a giant dictionary of (vegetarian) foods, each one listed with all the other foods they taste good with. As I was flipping through it, I discovered that fennel and butternut squash were supposed to taste good with each other, and with cheese, and the idea for this soup was born. It turned out well!

Dietary and accessibility notes: This soup can be made either vegan (no cheese) or vegetarian (with cheese garnish). It requires some chopping (especially of the fennel bulbs - you could substitute pre-chopped butternut squash, onions, and garlic), and an immersion blender, blender, or food processor for pureeing.

Ingredients )

Instructions )

Edited to add: [personal profile] sid has suggested that this might also be good with goat cheese, a suggestion I can only agree with. If so, you may want to increase the salt a little.
foxfirefey: A seal making a happy face. (seal of approval)
[personal profile] foxfirefey
Someone created a vegetable wellington and it looks amazing. I AM TOO LAZY TO MAKE THIS but somebody should and tell me how it goes.
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
I got a crock-pot from my parents as a holiday gift this year, and this is the recipe I chose to inaugurate it. It turned out very well, so I'm reposting it here [personal profile] jjhunter's encouragement. I've also posted it to my personal journal here, where the comments now include various useful pieces of advice and information about cooking with dried beans.

Squash and Black Bean Chili, from Judith Finlayson, The Healthy Slow Cooker: more than 100 recipes for health and wellness (Robert Rose: Toronto, 2006), pp. 288–9.


As written, this is a slow cooker/crock pot recipe, although it could probably work as a conventional stovetop recipe too, with appropriate cooking technique/time adjustments. It's vegetarian and vegan, although it includes an easy non-vegetarian variation if you're so inclined. It requires some stovetop pre-cooking and some heavy-duty chopping (unless you begin with pre-chopped squash, in which case it doesn't require much chopping at all).


Ingredients (in metric and imperial units, with some notes): )

Directions: )

NON-VEGETARIAN VARIATION )
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
This is my go-to winter soup recipe and my go-to vegetable soup recipe. It's the product of a slow evolution from this recipe in the March 2009 issue of Canadian Living: Hearty Vegetable Soup, which I've gradually modified to my liking. It's a pretty flexible recipe, actually, built on a foundation of tomato, onion, garlic, cumin, cinnamon, and oregano. Feel free to use the root vegetables and legumes of your choice! Likewise, it can be scaled up or down. I usually make it in my 10-litre soup pot, which the full recipe fills about halfway, but I've also made it in a tiny, 1-litre pot!

It's vegetarian (and indeed, vegan), and forms its own delicious broth as it cooks, so there's no need for pre-made stock or broth. It does, however, require some significant chopping and stirring.

Ingredients (in Imperial and Metric volume units) )
Directions )

The original recipe suggests serving the soup with sour cream, which would undoubtedly be tasty, but it's equally tasty on its own. It also makes excellent leftovers - its flavor improves once it's been sitting for a while.
lizcommotion: Lily and Chance squished in a cat pile-up on top of a cat tree (buff tabby, black cat with red collar) (Default)
[personal profile] lizcommotion
I posted this as a comment for a friend who is looking for soup recipes, and I figured since I wrote it up I might as well post it here as well. I don't know if this is duplicating another post, but anyway, here's how to make basically any soup with what you have in your fridge with a few simple ingredients.

Here is how I make "what needs to be used up in the fridge" soup, which can also turn into chili if you feel like seasoning it that way. Since it is infinitely adaptable, you can totally switch it up based on your dietary needs. I hope this makes sense; let me know if any of it needs clarification.

Clean Out Your Fridge Soup )
lizcommotion: Spongebob's pet snail Gary wearing a chef's hat (spongebob gary chef)
[personal profile] lizcommotion
I may have impulse bought a 4 lb. bag of quinoa from Costco the other week. Today I felt comfortable enough to try using quinoa instead of couscous in a highly butchered version of the way my Libyan mother-in-law cooks it. (Hers involves lamb, and more vegetables that I didn't have on hand, and probably some other things I don't know. It's delicious.)

The most important part of this recipe is a spice mixture called b'zaar. There are probably different ways of making it (just as there are different ways of making any curry powder.) If you have the ingredients, I highly recommend making some and using it in things like lentils, couscous, etc. It's nommy. However, in a pinch you could probably substitute another pre-made curry powder.

B'zaar (Libyan Curry Mix)
Read more... )

Libyan Style Quinoa
Read more... )

finished cooking photo )
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
This is one of my staple recipes, and after pouring it on some noodles and veggies, taking it for lunch, and having my office-mate comment on its delicious smell for the nth day in a row, it occurred to me that other people might enjoy it too.

It comes from the excellent, mostly-vegetarian cookbook of the mostly-vegetarian restaurant ReBar in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada:

Audrey Alsterberg and Wanda Urbanowicz, ReBar: Modern Food Cookbook (Victoria, BC, 2001), p. 40.

The sauce is vegetarian, easily made vegan, potentially gluten-free with gluten-free soy sauce and, if you have some kind of kitchen appliance with whirling blades (a blender by preference, but a hand/immersion blender or food processor would probably also work), takes very little chopping or mixing. It's also possible to mix it up by hand, but that requires a lot more careful mincing of things.

Ingredients (in imperial and metric volume units) )
Directions )

My favorite way to eat this is mixed into rice noodles and stir-fried or steamed vegetables. I usually toss the cooked noodles and vegetables in the sauce. The heat neutralizes the pungency of the garlic, although the sauce doesn't need to be cooked at all. It's also a delicious sauce for wraps!
lizcommotion: Spongebob's pet snail Gary wearing a chef's hat (spongebob gary chef)
[personal profile] lizcommotion
I found this recipe at a County Fair and again on the internet when I lost the original copy and have made it several times since then. It is delish and easy (as long as you have a food processor, otherwise chopping is done by hand). Very good for low spoon days. My one quibble is that it uses an oven, so it's best not to make it on super hot days. Otherwise, it's a great recipe for using old bread and delish seasonal tomatoes and basil. Cheese is optional, so it can be made either vegetarian or vegan.
Savory Tomato Bread Pudding )
 
wendelah1: (cooking)
[personal profile] wendelah1
This is a brand-new recipe for me, so new I haven't tried it yet. But this recipe from thekitchn.com is vegan and gluten-free, which was so exciting I thought I'd post it untested. There is a link to a printer friendly version at the webpage: Socca Flatbread with Spring Pesto and Salad

To the recipe )
rosefox: A cheerful chef made out of ginger. (cooking)
[personal profile] rosefox
I spent a fair amount of yesterday looking up various vegan soup recipes. They led me to conclude that you can make vegetable soup pretty much any way you want. So I improvised with what we had on hand, and I encourage you to likewise adjust this recipe to your own tastes and supplies. It's very flexible because you don't have to worry about different cooking times for different ingredients: it's all cooked into mush and then pureed.

You'll need a big pot for this. Our medium pot (5 quarts, I think?) barely handled it. Makes about nine 2-cup servings depending on how you adjust the quantities given.

The following are the ingredients I used, with suggestions for alternatives in parentheses.

Aromatics:
1 onion, chopped
(could be two, plus a crushed clove of garlic or two)
Spices:
a few shakes/grinds each of ground cumin, powdered ginger, and black pepper
(you could also try curry powder, turmeric, mustard powder, ras al hanout, whole mustard or cumin seeds, paprika, cayenne, etc.)
Vegetables:
1 enormous turnip, peeled and chopped--seriously, it was bigger than the onion!
3 carrots, peeled and chopped
2 ribs celery, chopped
.5 cup tomato puree
(could also include other root vegetables, zucchini, squash, peppers; for the tomato puree, you can substitute canned diced tomatoes or peeled and de-seeded fresh tomatoes if you have good ones on hand)
Protein:
1 cup red lentils, rinsed and picked through (or beans, chickpeas, or raw nuts)
2 cups cooked white rice (or .5 cup uncooked rice and 1 additional cup water)
Herbs:
2 sprigs fresh thyme
(and/or any other fresh or dried herbs you like; parsley or cilantro would be particularly good, or dried bay leaves, or you could be adventurous and try marjoram or sage)
Liquid:
4 cups (one 32-oz. box) vegetable broth
3 to 4 cups water

In your big pot, heat oil and a few drops of water over medium heat until the water sizzles. Add a dash of salt. Sauté aromatics 10 minutes until softened. Add and sauté spices 1 minute or until fragrant. Add remaining ingredients. Cover and bring to boil over medium heat, stirring to keep things from sticking to the bottom. Reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes, stirring occasionally and adding water as needed so the liquid just covers the solids.

Adjust seasonings to taste and simmer 15 more minutes or until all the solids are soft and mushy. Remove from heat and let cool 10 minutes. Remove thyme stems; if the leaves haven't already fallen off them, strip the leaves off and stir them into the soup, discarding the stems. (If using bay leaves, take those out too.) Puree the soup with a stick blender or in batches in a regular blender. At this point, if you're not eating it right away, you can distribute the soup into containers, let it cool to room temp, and store in fridge or freezer.

Before serving, return to pot and heat; add a splash of red wine vinegar or a squeeze of lemon or lime if you like; serve garnished with fresh thyme or parsley.

Lentils + rice = complete protein, hooray! There's probably a ton of fiber in there too. This is definitely Good For You as well as being tasty. And it's easy.

Most of the flavor in the soup comes from the broth and the spices and herbs; don't expect the vegetables to flavor it much unless you want to go to the trouble of roasting them beforehand. If your soup isn't very flavorful, add some vegetable boullion, or increase the spices at the 30-minute flavor-adjusting mark. The vinegar or citrus juice will punch it up too. Enjoy!
cougars_catnip: (Default)
[personal profile] cougars_catnip
Not being vegan I'm not sure how good these are but when I saw the recipe in Taste of Home I thought of ya'll .

Read more... )
rosefox: A spark crossing a spark gap with the word "aha!". (aha!)
[personal profile] rosefox
I was never a big cheese fan even before I cut dairy out of my diet, but one of the few cheeses I really miss is Gruyere. It's creamy and nutty and earthy and rich and I used to use it for basically everything. One of my long-held hopes has been to find a way to make a vegan Gruyère-style sauce, but all the recipes I've seen have been long and complicated and involved nooch, which I really dislike, so I'd mostly given up.

Tonight I was Googling cheeseless pizza recipes and saw a potato pizza recipe (which sounds really yummy and I will definitely make it another time). That got me thinking about potato soups and how a really thick potato soup wouldn't be all that different from melted cheese if you flavored it right... it's goopy, it browns on top when you heat it, and the base is almost flavorless and easy to mess around with.

An hour later--including time it took to run out to the store--I had created the best vegan "cheese" sauce I've ever had in my life. It's so simple I'm not even going to cut-tag it.

Ingredients:
1 large Idaho potato (would probably be even better with Yukon Golds but my grocery didn't have them)
1/8 cup unsalted roasted cashews
Olive oil
Nutmeg
Salt

Tools:
Small pot, strainer, bowl, blender or stick blender

Peel the potato and cut it into small chunks. Place in a small pot with the cashews and add cold water to cover. Boil until very thoroughly cooked. Place the strainer over the bowl and pour in the potatoes and cashews, reserving the cooking water. Put the potatoes and cashews in the blender, or back in the pot if you're using a stick blender. Add in 1/2 cup of cooking water and blend at high speed until very creamy. Add a drizzle of olive oil, nutmeg, and salt to taste, and blend again. If you like nooch, try adding a pinch; it would probably give it a bit of extra depth. Run through the strainer a second time if there are chunks of nuts that the blender didn't catch.

I made a mini pizza with the "cheese", arugula, and salami, and it was superb: browned on top, still gooey underneath. It would work well on potatoes (that sounds sort of cannibalistic, doesn't it?) or pasta or broccoli--anything you'd make gratinée, basically. Adjust the flavorings to make something closer to cheddar (paprika? cider vinegar? miso paste? mess around and find what works) and it would be killer on nachos. The texture is great for dipping chips or crackers or veggies or slices of apple and pear. If you want to be adventurous, try treating it like curds and see if you can make a solid block of "cheese" out of it! I'll be curious to see what the texture's like after I store it in the fridge.

The major downside of potato "cheese" over soy/nut versions is that it doesn't have much protein. The major upside is that people with soy allergies can eat it! And it is so, so simple to make. Enjoy!
lifesnotasong: (Isabela)
[personal profile] lifesnotasong
I've been making this pretty often lately, so I thought I'd share. I modified a chili recipe from Smitten Kitchen to work with my crockpot, and changed a few ingredients to work with what I tend to have in my kitchen. This chili is nicely non-spicy (for the wusses among us, myself included), and the recipe usually makes 6 servings for my girlfriend and I, though servings will vary based on serving size. It freezes and reheats well, making it great for packed lunches (assuming you have a microwave handy).

On to the recipe! )
feuervogel: (food)
[personal profile] feuervogel
(Or lazy-ass lasagna.)

Serves 4.

You will need:
1/2 lb pasta (penne, rigatoni, fusilli/rotini, bowties, etc. Not spaghetti, angel hair, etc.)
16 oz jar pasta sauce (one you like)
15 oz tub ricotta
6-8 oz mozzarella, shredded

8x8 baking dish, sprayed with non-stick spray

Step 1: Cook 1/2 lb pasta as directed on package. Drain.
Step 2: Return pasta to pot.
Step 3: Pour approximately half your pasta sauce into the pot with the pasta. Stir.
Step 4: Spoon approximately half your ricotta into the pot with the pasta and sauce. Stir until thoroughly mixed. (Sauce may appear unpleasant at this stage.)
Step 5: Dump contents of pot evenly into baking dish.
Step 6: Cover with shredded mozzarella.
Step 7: Bake in preheated 375-degree oven for 25-30 minutes, or until cheese is bubbly.

This can be made vegan by substituting soft or silken tofu for the ricotta and your favorite cheese substitute for the mozzarella.

You can easily double the recipe for larger groups. Use a 9x13 baking dish instead. This is my go-to potluck dish if I'm pressed for time.

(crossposted from my journal)
delladea: (Default)
[personal profile] delladea
I've been introducing more vegetarian nights into our weekly menus to save some money. I found this coconut lentil soup recipe and modified it based on my tastes and what I had on hand. The result was a yummy, thick curry that my carnivore husband had to have seconds and thirds of. It gets even better after sitting in the 'fridge overnight.

My Modified Recipe )

We ate this with some curried collard greens and gluten-free naan. I highly recommend the yummy bread for dipping, but it's pretty good all by itself too. We got four large servings out of this recipe, enough for dinner last night and for both of us to have it for lunch the next day.
sid: (cooking Whisk)
[personal profile] sid
15 ounce can chickpeas (garbanzos), drained, rinsed
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
8 ounce can no-salt-added tomato sauce
1 Tbsp curry powder
1 tsp cumin
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper or to taste (if you have wussy tastebuds like mine you'll want to start with less)

Wow, this is simple but good! read more )
starlightsaoirse: new haircut (Default)
[personal profile] starlightsaoirse
A vegan friend of mine left a package of store-bought seitan strips in my fridge after visiting recently. I've never tried seitan, but I'm game for anything (also the contents of my fridge are looking a little sparse). However, I have absolutely no idea what to do with the stuff, and most of the recipes I'm finding online are telling me how to make seitan, which isn't helpful at all.

Any suggestions on what I can do with my newfound supply of wheat meat?

Thanks in advance!

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