highlyeccentric: Demon's Covenant - Kitchen!fail - I saw you put rice in the toaster (Demon's Covenant - kitchen!fail)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
Adapted, with what I call success, from Anna Jones' A Modern Way To Eat:

Dietary and accessibility notes )

What you need and what you do with it )

This makes about 5 servings. It's sort of like vegetarian harira, which means I'm going to be disappointed in the way the frozen portions turn out, I suspect.
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
I made this salad for supper tonight, as I do quite often in the summer, and it occurred to me that I could also post it here. My version is a slight evolution (or more accurately devolution?) of this 2008 Canadian Living recipe. I also use the dressing/vinaigrette on normal salads.

Accessibility and dietary notes )

Ingredients and directions )
jjhunter: Watercolor purple ruffled monster with mouthful of raw vegetables looks exceedingly self-pleased (veggie monster)
[personal profile] jjhunter
Cheap, easy, stores well, and can be jazzed up with further additions to vary latter servings - this recipe is one of my fallback staples.

ingredients )

Instructions:
Heat oil in heavy-bottomed pot (you'll need a lid later) and saute onion and garlic until translucent. Add ginger, tumeric and curry powder and saute a few minutes longer. (Can add more oil if necessary.) Add rice and saute for a few more minutes to coat the rice. Add the lentils, stock, raisins, and sunflower seeds, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 25 minutes.

Excellent served with yogurt, or with Waldorf salad.

Extras my mom recommends:
Would be good with butternut squash...roasted in chunks (with parsnips perhaps? ) or bake the squash, scoop it out and whip it with a bit of orange juice and nutmeg. Saute some dark greens (chard, spinach) with olive oil, garlic, pinenuts as a second vegetable.
lassarina: (Zack)
[personal profile] lassarina
I made these for dinner tonight (well, actually, I made twice this amount and we'll have lunches to pack all week.) Simple, hearty, and healthy.

dietary and accessibility notes )

Sweet Potato, Black Bean, and Corn Enchiladas )
highlyeccentric: Demon's Covenant - Kitchen!fail - I saw you put rice in the toaster (Demon's Covenant - kitchen!fail)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
This is pretty much the recipe from Leanne Brown's Gooxd and Cheap, with a few tweaks according to what I had on hand.

Dietary and accessibility notes )

Serves 2

What you need and what you do with it )
highlyeccentric: Demon's Covenant - Kitchen!fail - I saw you put rice in the toaster (Demon's Covenant - kitchen!fail)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
So I accidentally tipped WAY TOO MUCH rosemary into the first stage of a recipe that called for thyme, and the result was amazing.

Diet and accessibilty notes )

What you need and what you do with it )

Adapted from a recipe in Jack Monroe's 'A Year in 120 Recipes'.
highlyeccentric: Demon's Covenant - Kitchen!fail - I saw you put rice in the toaster (Demon's Covenant - kitchen!fail)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
I don't get to make Haloumi Pilaf much anymore, because the fried Haloumi really needs two people to eat it up (it tastes weird after it's cooled) and because haloumi is really hard to find here.

Today I finally made an acceptable alternative. I also solved my 'the spinach in this dish is giving it a grainy texture, wtf I thought I'd washed the stuff' problem, *and* the goat's cheese will last with the leftovers.

Dietary and accessibility notes )

What you need and what you do with it )
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
For Christmas, my parents gave me Karen Page, The Vegetarian Flavor Bible, which is essentially a giant dictionary of (vegetarian) foods, each one listed with all the other foods they taste good with. As I was flipping through it, I discovered that fennel and butternut squash were supposed to taste good with each other, and with cheese, and the idea for this soup was born. It turned out well!

Dietary and accessibility notes: This soup can be made either vegan (no cheese) or vegetarian (with cheese garnish). It requires some chopping (especially of the fennel bulbs - you could substitute pre-chopped butternut squash, onions, and garlic), and an immersion blender, blender, or food processor for pureeing.

Ingredients )

Instructions )

Edited to add: [personal profile] sid has suggested that this might also be good with goat cheese, a suggestion I can only agree with. If so, you may want to increase the salt a little.
foxfirefey: A seal making a happy face. (seal of approval)
[personal profile] foxfirefey
Someone created a vegetable wellington and it looks amazing. I AM TOO LAZY TO MAKE THIS but somebody should and tell me how it goes.
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
A new deli has opened in my neighbourhood recently, and a couple of weeks ago I stopped in to check it out. As soon as I ordered my vegetable sandwich, the owner had me pegged as a vegetarian, and she spent the rest of my wait for my sandwich explaining the vegetarian options she already offered, and asking me for my suggestions. She tried to induce me to try some roasted red pepper-smoked gouda soup, but my takeout preferences run to things I can't make nearly as well myself (like amazing delicious sandwiches on massive sesame-challah buns) and soup doesn't fit that category. However, having determined that roasted red pepper-smoked gouda soup is a thing, I decided to make some.

I used this recipe as a guideline, and came out with some pretty delicious soup. If the prospect of grating up a bunch of fancy cheese and melting it into a pot of pureed veggies sounds like something you'd enjoy, this is definitely a soup for you.

Dietary note: This is largely vegetarian, depending on your tolerance for cheese that may use animal rennet. If you only eat rennet-free cheese and rennet-free smoked gouda is something you can get your hands on, not a problem. If not, I'm afraid the cheese is what makes this soup (although you might be able to get something similar in taste with a combination of liquid smoke and some kind of sharp white vegetarian cheese).

Accessibility note: This is a pretty easy soup chopping-wise; it's pureed, so no need to be finicky about chopping the veggies. It does require an immersion blender (or at least some kind of blender) and opening some jars, though.

Smoked Gouda, Roasted Pepper, and Tomato Soup )
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
I made what I consider a delicious batch of vegetarian friend rice for supper tonight, and since I was writing it up anyway in the hope of being able to reproduce it in the future, I thought I'd share it here as well.

Dietary note: I made this with egg, so it's not vegan, but it would probably be pretty tasty without egg, with extra cabbage, or with some crumbled tofu.

Accessibility note: This dish involves several preparation steps including pre-cooking the rice and pre-making the sauce. It also requires chopping (although you could use pre-chopped or grated carrots and pre-shredded cabbage to cut down on that) and ten to fifteen minutes of standing over a hot wok or skillet stirring.

The sauce I used come from my favorite cookbook, Audrey Alsterburg and Wanda Urbanowicz, ReBar Modern Food Cookbook, and it's great for general stir-fry purposes too. Here's the recipe:

Soy Chile Sauce )

Here's the recipe for the rice:

Vegetarian Fried Rice )
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
I got a crock-pot from my parents as a holiday gift this year, and this is the recipe I chose to inaugurate it. It turned out very well, so I'm reposting it here [personal profile] jjhunter's encouragement. I've also posted it to my personal journal here, where the comments now include various useful pieces of advice and information about cooking with dried beans.

Squash and Black Bean Chili, from Judith Finlayson, The Healthy Slow Cooker: more than 100 recipes for health and wellness (Robert Rose: Toronto, 2006), pp. 288–9.


As written, this is a slow cooker/crock pot recipe, although it could probably work as a conventional stovetop recipe too, with appropriate cooking technique/time adjustments. It's vegetarian and vegan, although it includes an easy non-vegetarian variation if you're so inclined. It requires some stovetop pre-cooking and some heavy-duty chopping (unless you begin with pre-chopped squash, in which case it doesn't require much chopping at all).


Ingredients (in metric and imperial units, with some notes): )

Directions: )

NON-VEGETARIAN VARIATION )
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
This is my go-to winter soup recipe and my go-to vegetable soup recipe. It's the product of a slow evolution from this recipe in the March 2009 issue of Canadian Living: Hearty Vegetable Soup, which I've gradually modified to my liking. It's a pretty flexible recipe, actually, built on a foundation of tomato, onion, garlic, cumin, cinnamon, and oregano. Feel free to use the root vegetables and legumes of your choice! Likewise, it can be scaled up or down. I usually make it in my 10-litre soup pot, which the full recipe fills about halfway, but I've also made it in a tiny, 1-litre pot!

It's vegetarian (and indeed, vegan), and forms its own delicious broth as it cooks, so there's no need for pre-made stock or broth. It does, however, require some significant chopping and stirring.

Ingredients (in Imperial and Metric volume units) )
Directions )

The original recipe suggests serving the soup with sour cream, which would undoubtedly be tasty, but it's equally tasty on its own. It also makes excellent leftovers - its flavor improves once it's been sitting for a while.
feuervogel: (food)
[personal profile] feuervogel
1 large or 1.5 med onions, diced (about 2 cups)
1 15-oz can diced tomatoes with chilies
1 28-oz can chunky tomato sauce
3 Tbsp molasses
~1 lb sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped small
~6 oz canned pumpkin
~1/2 package Quorn grounds
1 bottle porter beer (optional)
1 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp chili powder

1. Saute the onions in olive oil until translucent. (Optional; I prefer my onions cooked more than they get in a crock pot.)
2. Combine all ingredients in slow cooker and cook on high 3-4 hours or until done. (Spice quantities are estimates; adjust to taste.) (I assume you could do it longer on low.)

Serve with pumpkin spoon bread. (This is why there's a remnant of canned pumpkin in the chili, you see.) Bake the spoon bread toward the last hour of cooking, and it'll be nice and hot in your bowl.

(xposted from my journal)
highlyeccentric: Manly cooking: Bradley James wielding a stick-mixer (Manly cooking)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
This evening I had planned to make the autumn vegetable roast from easy vegetarian one-pot, but I had some white wine and a craving for Tarragon Chicken Tray Bake - but neither tarragon nor chicken. A bit of googling, the vague process outline from In the Kitchen's spicy vegetable bake, and this happened:

Dietary and accessibility notes )

Ingredients and method )

This works perfectly well as a one-pot meal. If I were serving it at a dinner party, though, I would accompany it with something... I'm thinking of my mother's cold rice and apple salad, which doesn't seem to be duplicated online but is not entirely unlike this rice salad here. Chronic meat-eaters might find baked vegetables like this a good accompaniment to roast chicken (stuff with sliced apples? Or is that overkill on the apples... lemon might counter-balance the sweetness nicely).

~

** I haven't worked out the ideal temperature / time ratio. An hour was nooot quite enough at 180 degrees. Either up the temperature or extend the time! I have this problem with the spicy vegetable bake, too.
lizcommotion: Lily and Chance squished in a cat pile-up on top of a cat tree (buff tabby, black cat with red collar) (Default)
[personal profile] lizcommotion
I posted this as a comment for a friend who is looking for soup recipes, and I figured since I wrote it up I might as well post it here as well. I don't know if this is duplicating another post, but anyway, here's how to make basically any soup with what you have in your fridge with a few simple ingredients.

Here is how I make "what needs to be used up in the fridge" soup, which can also turn into chili if you feel like seasoning it that way. Since it is infinitely adaptable, you can totally switch it up based on your dietary needs. I hope this makes sense; let me know if any of it needs clarification.

Clean Out Your Fridge Soup )
lizcommotion: Spongebob's pet snail Gary wearing a chef's hat (spongebob gary chef)
[personal profile] lizcommotion
I may have impulse bought a 4 lb. bag of quinoa from Costco the other week. Today I felt comfortable enough to try using quinoa instead of couscous in a highly butchered version of the way my Libyan mother-in-law cooks it. (Hers involves lamb, and more vegetables that I didn't have on hand, and probably some other things I don't know. It's delicious.)

The most important part of this recipe is a spice mixture called b'zaar. There are probably different ways of making it (just as there are different ways of making any curry powder.) If you have the ingredients, I highly recommend making some and using it in things like lentils, couscous, etc. It's nommy. However, in a pinch you could probably substitute another pre-made curry powder.

B'zaar (Libyan Curry Mix)
Read more... )

Libyan Style Quinoa
Read more... )

finished cooking photo )
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
This is one of my staple recipes, and after pouring it on some noodles and veggies, taking it for lunch, and having my office-mate comment on its delicious smell for the nth day in a row, it occurred to me that other people might enjoy it too.

It comes from the excellent, mostly-vegetarian cookbook of the mostly-vegetarian restaurant ReBar in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada:

Audrey Alsterberg and Wanda Urbanowicz, ReBar: Modern Food Cookbook (Victoria, BC, 2001), p. 40.

The sauce is vegetarian, easily made vegan, potentially gluten-free with gluten-free soy sauce and, if you have some kind of kitchen appliance with whirling blades (a blender by preference, but a hand/immersion blender or food processor would probably also work), takes very little chopping or mixing. It's also possible to mix it up by hand, but that requires a lot more careful mincing of things.

Ingredients (in imperial and metric volume units) )
Directions )

My favorite way to eat this is mixed into rice noodles and stir-fried or steamed vegetables. I usually toss the cooked noodles and vegetables in the sauce. The heat neutralizes the pungency of the garlic, although the sauce doesn't need to be cooked at all. It's also a delicious sauce for wraps!
redsnake05: Chopping an onion (Creative: Cooking)
[personal profile] redsnake05
I'm going to a potluck tonight, and I am taking these little morsels of delicious. I found them originally at Jelly Toast, but made several changes to the recipe.

Read more... )

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