lizcommotion: Spongebob's pet snail Gary wearing a chef's hat (spongebob gary chef)
[personal profile] lizcommotion
I found this recipe at a County Fair and again on the internet when I lost the original copy and have made it several times since then. It is delish and easy (as long as you have a food processor, otherwise chopping is done by hand). Very good for low spoon days. My one quibble is that it uses an oven, so it's best not to make it on super hot days. Otherwise, it's a great recipe for using old bread and delish seasonal tomatoes and basil. Cheese is optional, so it can be made either vegetarian or vegan.
Savory Tomato Bread Pudding )
 

Home Fries

Feb. 2nd, 2013 05:18 pm
branchandroot: oak against sky (Default)
[personal profile] branchandroot
So, I wanted to make a quick batch of fries for the sake of chili-cheese fries this evening, and wound up tossing a lot of potatoes in the pan with a slug of salt and sugar for luck and shallow-frying them by the seat of my pants. They turned out way better than I expected, so I thought I'd share!

Quick and dirty home fries )

Om nom nom.
afrikate: Ray Kowalski is getting his geek on, with his clip on shades flipped up (Default)
[personal profile] afrikate
I had some spare time today and ended up making this dal makhani recipe. It's the second time I've made it, and it is just as amazing as I remembered. It has a lot of butter and cream in it, so it's not for everyone, but that's probably what makes it so delicious.


Dal Makhani

Overnight, soak:
1 c. urad dal
2 T. red kidney beans
4 c. water

In the morning, drain the beans, then add 4 c. water along with:
1 c. onions, finely chopped
2 T. ginger, finely chopped
1/2 c. canned tomatoes, drained
1 c. plain yogurt
1/2 t. cardamom
1 T. coriander
1/2 t. red pepper
2 t. kosher salt (I use iodized salt, and put it in after about 3 hours of simmering, rather than at the beginning)
8 T. butter or 6 T. ghee

Bring to a boil, then simmer on low for 5 hours. When finished, puree 2-3 cups of cooked beans.

While the beans cook, prepare the perfumed butter:
4 T. veg oil or ghee
1.5 t. cumin seeds
1 cup of finely chopped onions

Heat veg oil (or ghee) over medium-high heat in a small skillet. When very hot, add cumin seeds and cook until they turn dark brown (about 10 seconds). Add onions, and cook while stirring continuously until light brown (about 10 min.).

Once the beans have cooked, add the perfumed butter, 1/2 c. heavy cream, and 1/4 c. chopped cilantro. Serve over rice.

You can freeze, though I never actually have enough left to do that. :)
feuervogel: (food)
[personal profile] feuervogel
It's getting cooler out, and I love a nice curry in fall. A friend shared a link to a recipe for homemade curry roux, and we tried the basic recipe once. It was fine, but I thought about the various other flavors of curry I've gotten in the boxes at the Japanese grocery store, and I decided to try something a little different.

3 Tbsp butter
1/4 c flour
1.5 Tbsp garam masala
0.5 Tbsp hot curry powder (or to taste)
1 Tbsp cinnamon
1 tsp pureed ginger
1 Tbsp molasses
1 Tbsp tonkatsu sauce

1. Melt the butter over medium low heat.
2. Mix the flour, garam masala, and cinnamon in and stir until they form a thick paste.
3. Stir in the ginger, molasses, and tonkatsu sauce, and cook until it starts to crumble. (This takes 5-10 minutes, so don't fret.) Set aside.
4. Add roux to curry as directed in the original recipe.

Oh, and here's the vegetables & stuff I put in the curry (in order): onions, mushrooms, Quorn tenders, sweet potatoes, kabocha squash. The wonderful part of a curry is that you can use whatever vegetables you like best and/or are in season.
acelightning: oval loaf of crusty bread (bread)
[personal profile] acelightning
This is a bit time-consuming, but most of it is just waiting for the dough to rise (more than once). If you have a heavy-duty mixer, like the classic KitchenAid, it helps a lot. Makes 1 loaf.

SPONGE:
1/2 cup bread flour (see Note 1)
1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
3/4 teaspoons yeast (the rest of the packet will be used later)
1 tablespoon sugar or honey
1 tablespoon nonfat dry milk
1 cup + 2 tablespoons water at "room temperature" (between 70° and 90° F.)

Whisk this all together in your mixer bowl, or a large bowl, until it's smooth and well-combined.

DOUGH:
1 cup bread flour (see Note 1)
1 cup whole-wheat flour
The rest of the yeast

Mix thoroughly, and sprinkle it evenly over the sponge in the bowl, covering the sponge completely. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to ferment for 1 to 4 hours at room temperature. (Or allow to rise for 1 hour at room temperature, then refrigerate overnight. Let it warm up a bit before proceeding.)

FINISHING THE MIXTURE:

1/2 cup cracked wheat (coarse bulgur)

Place in a dry frying pan over medium heat; shake or stir continuously until lightly toasted. Remove from pan immediately so it doesn't burn. If you want it less crunchy in your bread, pour 1/2 cup boiling water over the cracked wheat and let it stand until the water is absorbed.

When the sponge is ready, add the cracked wheat, along with
1/4 cup peanut butter (see Note 2)
1/4 cup brown sugar, packed
1 teaspoon salt

Mix thoroughly, then cover and let stand for 20 minutes. Knead by hand or machine for approximately 10 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic - poke in any bits of cracked wheat that keep trying to escape. Cover and let rise until doubled, 1 to 1 1/2 hours. (Optional: Punch down, knead briefly, and let rise again.)

Preheat oven to 350° F. Grease a 9"x5" loaf pan. Punch the dough down and shape it into a loaf to fit in the pan. Let rise until almost doubled - top of dough should be just a bit higher than the top edge of the pan. Bake for 45 to 55 minutes - an instant-read thermometer plunged into the center will read 210° F. Turn out onto a rack immediately, turn the loaf right-side-up, and allow to cool.

A slice of this will take you clear to Rivendell! :-)


Note 1: Instead of bread flour, you can use unbleached all-purpose flour, and add 1 1/2 tablespoons "vital wheat gluten" powder to the "Dough" mixture.

Note 2: Creamy peanut butter works better, because the chunks will get lost among the bits of cracked wheat.
cougars_catnip: (Default)
[personal profile] cougars_catnip

Read more... )
rosefox: A spark crossing a spark gap with the word "aha!". (aha!)
[personal profile] rosefox
I was never a big cheese fan even before I cut dairy out of my diet, but one of the few cheeses I really miss is Gruyere. It's creamy and nutty and earthy and rich and I used to use it for basically everything. One of my long-held hopes has been to find a way to make a vegan Gruyère-style sauce, but all the recipes I've seen have been long and complicated and involved nooch, which I really dislike, so I'd mostly given up.

Tonight I was Googling cheeseless pizza recipes and saw a potato pizza recipe (which sounds really yummy and I will definitely make it another time). That got me thinking about potato soups and how a really thick potato soup wouldn't be all that different from melted cheese if you flavored it right... it's goopy, it browns on top when you heat it, and the base is almost flavorless and easy to mess around with.

An hour later--including time it took to run out to the store--I had created the best vegan "cheese" sauce I've ever had in my life. It's so simple I'm not even going to cut-tag it.

Ingredients:
1 large Idaho potato (would probably be even better with Yukon Golds but my grocery didn't have them)
1/8 cup unsalted roasted cashews
Olive oil
Nutmeg
Salt

Tools:
Small pot, strainer, bowl, blender or stick blender

Peel the potato and cut it into small chunks. Place in a small pot with the cashews and add cold water to cover. Boil until very thoroughly cooked. Place the strainer over the bowl and pour in the potatoes and cashews, reserving the cooking water. Put the potatoes and cashews in the blender, or back in the pot if you're using a stick blender. Add in 1/2 cup of cooking water and blend at high speed until very creamy. Add a drizzle of olive oil, nutmeg, and salt to taste, and blend again. If you like nooch, try adding a pinch; it would probably give it a bit of extra depth. Run through the strainer a second time if there are chunks of nuts that the blender didn't catch.

I made a mini pizza with the "cheese", arugula, and salami, and it was superb: browned on top, still gooey underneath. It would work well on potatoes (that sounds sort of cannibalistic, doesn't it?) or pasta or broccoli--anything you'd make gratinée, basically. Adjust the flavorings to make something closer to cheddar (paprika? cider vinegar? miso paste? mess around and find what works) and it would be killer on nachos. The texture is great for dipping chips or crackers or veggies or slices of apple and pear. If you want to be adventurous, try treating it like curds and see if you can make a solid block of "cheese" out of it! I'll be curious to see what the texture's like after I store it in the fridge.

The major downside of potato "cheese" over soy/nut versions is that it doesn't have much protein. The major upside is that people with soy allergies can eat it! And it is so, so simple to make. Enjoy!
shadowandflame: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowandflame
Randomly bought an eggplant the other day, and decided to do a tomato eggplant bake this morning since I have the day off. :) This is based on my vague memories of the last time I did an eggplant bake, plus some random ingredients I had in the fridge, but it turned out really well.

The recipe )
lauredhel: Coffee stain, captioned ANOTHER CUP? (coffee)
[personal profile] lauredhel
Manakish! (Lebanese pizza bread, also spelt manaqish, manaeesh, manakeesh, or manoush).

For my fellow PWD, the prep can be done sitting down, and a breadmaker takes care of much of the heavy lifting. Za'atar mix could be made in advance. The physically hardest bits are rolling and prepping the dough, and getting the cookie sheets in and out of the oven.

Recipe and photos behind the cut.

Read more... )
metawidget: a basket of vegetables: summer and winter squash, zucchini, tomatoes. (food)
[personal profile] metawidget

This recipe is sort of a mushrooms Bourguignon, fairly easy to make and good comfort food. The original is double the size and considerably sweeter; I cut out the brown sugar and added a little flour to thicken the sauce. It's about an hour from start to finish, but 45 minutes of that is letting it simmer down.

Mushrooms Berkeley

Adapted from Anna Thomas' The Vegetarian Epicure

the source uses the words 'dark and evil-looking'... )
lifesnotasong: (Isabela)
[personal profile] lifesnotasong
I've been making this pretty often lately, so I thought I'd share. I modified a chili recipe from Smitten Kitchen to work with my crockpot, and changed a few ingredients to work with what I tend to have in my kitchen. This chili is nicely non-spicy (for the wusses among us, myself included), and the recipe usually makes 6 servings for my girlfriend and I, though servings will vary based on serving size. It freezes and reheats well, making it great for packed lunches (assuming you have a microwave handy).

On to the recipe! )
kaberett: A pomegranate, with eyes and mouth drawn onto masking tape and applied (pomegranate)
[personal profile] kaberett
I spend a fair bit of my time at the moment cooking in a group where the dietary restrictions are (1) vegetarian (2) dairy-free (3) gluten-free (4) cane sugar-free.

And, well, cake is nice.

So I took my standard recipe, and we adapted it.

Standard ingredients. )

The modified version goes like this:

300g dark chocolate
200g soya Pure (or other hard or semi-hard fat)
5 eggs
250ml agave syrup
1 tsp vanilla
300g hazelnut meal
pinch of salt
raspberries

Pre-heat oven to 180degC.
Melt chocolate and fat together (either in a heat-proof bowl over simmering water, or in the microwave).
Beat eggs, agave syrup, vanilla (and any booze you want to use) together until thick.
Pour the melted chocolate mixture into the egg mixture and stir thoroughly.
Add the hazelnut flour and the salt and mix thoroughly.
Scatter raspberries liberally across the bottom of your desired baking pan (I tend to go for large rectangular pans, ceramic if I can get them) and stick in the oven for about 30 minutes. If at any point it starts to burn, cover with a sheet of tin foil.

Notes
This was our first attempt at this particular version of the modifications, and next time I'll probably either up the hazelnut meal a little more, or ditch one of the eggs. I'll also be rather more liberal with the vanilla, because the roasted hazelnut flour we used needed a little more of a boost than it ended up getting with these quantities.
Another excellent variant is halving and coring pears, filling the hollow with brown sugar, placing them cut-side-down in the baking tray, and using almond meal & cinnamon/nutmeg/etc in the batter.
feuervogel: (food)
[personal profile] feuervogel
(Or lazy-ass lasagna.)

Serves 4.

You will need:
1/2 lb pasta (penne, rigatoni, fusilli/rotini, bowties, etc. Not spaghetti, angel hair, etc.)
16 oz jar pasta sauce (one you like)
15 oz tub ricotta
6-8 oz mozzarella, shredded

8x8 baking dish, sprayed with non-stick spray

Step 1: Cook 1/2 lb pasta as directed on package. Drain.
Step 2: Return pasta to pot.
Step 3: Pour approximately half your pasta sauce into the pot with the pasta. Stir.
Step 4: Spoon approximately half your ricotta into the pot with the pasta and sauce. Stir until thoroughly mixed. (Sauce may appear unpleasant at this stage.)
Step 5: Dump contents of pot evenly into baking dish.
Step 6: Cover with shredded mozzarella.
Step 7: Bake in preheated 375-degree oven for 25-30 minutes, or until cheese is bubbly.

This can be made vegan by substituting soft or silken tofu for the ricotta and your favorite cheese substitute for the mozzarella.

You can easily double the recipe for larger groups. Use a 9x13 baking dish instead. This is my go-to potluck dish if I'm pressed for time.

(crossposted from my journal)
delladea: (Default)
[personal profile] delladea
I've been introducing more vegetarian nights into our weekly menus to save some money. I found this coconut lentil soup recipe and modified it based on my tastes and what I had on hand. The result was a yummy, thick curry that my carnivore husband had to have seconds and thirds of. It gets even better after sitting in the 'fridge overnight.

My Modified Recipe )

We ate this with some curried collard greens and gluten-free naan. I highly recommend the yummy bread for dipping, but it's pretty good all by itself too. We got four large servings out of this recipe, enough for dinner last night and for both of us to have it for lunch the next day.
acelightning: shiny purple plate with cartoon flatware (eats03)
[personal profile] acelightning
This is a clear, syrupy caramel sauce which goes well on ice cream, cheesecake, plain cake, filled dessert crepes - almost anything you'd want caramel sauce on, although intensely chocolate things tend to overwhelm it. I call it "double serendipity" because of two "mistakes" I made that turned it from a fairly basic caramel syrup into something with a deep, intriguing flavor.

The first mistake was that I put a dollop of Lyle's Golden Syrup(*) in at the beginning. The cookbook I was looking at had two recipes for caramel sauce, a clear one and one made with cream, and they were on facing pages. The recipes started out the same, but the cream sauce called for golden syrup. When I realized my mistake, I figured it wouldn't make any difference in the end, and it would give it more flavor.

The second mistake I made was to cook the first batch too long; when it cooled, it wasn't spoonable. I had to add more water and boil it some more to get the proper consistency. I had added the flavorings at the end of the first cooking process, which is normal, but they got thoroughly boiled when I re-cooked the mixture. The taste was ambrosial! The second time I made it, I cooked it the right amount of time, and added the liquor and vanilla at the end again... and it was just rum-flavored caramel sauce, tasty enough, but nothing special. Somehow adding the flavorings before the final boiling cooks off the raw alcohol taste and makes everything meld together into a uniquely delicious flavor. (And one of these days I'm going to try adding a bit of sea salt.)
DOUBLE SERENDIPITY CARAMEL SAUCE

1 cup granulated sugar [200 g caster sugar]
1/4 cup [60 ml] water
1 very heaping tablespoonful of Lyle's Golden Syrup(*)
Have ready by the stove:
1 cup [240 ml] very hot water
3 tablespoons [45 ml] dark rum (I use Appleton's Jamaica Rum, which is very flavorful)
1 tablespoon [15 ml] pure vanilla extract

Place the sugar, the smaller amount of water, and the syrup in a heavy saucepan with a capacity of at least 1 quart [1 liter]. Cook and stir over moderately high heat until everything is thoroughly dissolved, then stop stirring and watch it until it turns a deep golden color, but don't let it get too dark or it will start to taste bitter. Remove the pan from the head and slowly and carefully add the larger amonut of water - it will boil up in a great hissing, bubbling fuss. Stir a bit, then add the rum and vanilla, which will probably bubble up a little more. Return the pot to the stove, reduce the heat a little, and stir until everything is dissolved again. Bring it back to the boil and stop stirring. Boil it until it has reduced to 1 cup [240 ml] in volume; I periodically pour it into the heatproof cup I measured the water in, and then pour it back into the pan if it needs to cook more. When it's done, let it cool in the heatproof cup until it's just warm, then pour it into a jar with a lid. Store, covered, at room temperature. (If your room is chilly, after a couple of days the syrup may start to form crystals around the edges; if they bother you, reheat it gently while stirring.)

(*) Lyle's Golden Syrup is a British product that is now found in many US supermarkets. It's "refiner's syrup", the thick, golden, slightly brown-sugar flavored syrup that's left at the end of the sugar-refining process. It not only adds color and flavor, it helps prevent candies and sauces from crystallizing.
paxpinnae: Rainbow Dash, hanging out (and down). (friendship is magic)
[personal profile] paxpinnae
The holiday season may be over, but cranberries are still in season in the Northern Hemisphere. This relish is amazing served on bread, bagels, or toast, or mixed with yogurt or cottage cheese, or eaten with a spoon.

1 orange, unpeeled, washed, seeded, and cut into small chunks (at least eighths)
1 large Bosc pear (the riper the better), unpeeled, cored, and cut into small chunks (again, at least eighths)
2.5 cups (10 oz) fresh or defrosted cranberries
0.5 cup sugar
0.5 cup walnuts, if you are a nuts sort of person. If not, feel free to leave them out; it's delicious either way.

Combine in food processor and blend until coarsely chopped. Don't stress if you overblend, though, it stays tasty as a puree. In extremity you CAN make this by hand. It just takes an incredibly long time to chop everything. Theoretically this can be frozen, but no one in my family has been able to test this hypothesis, as we're too busy eating it at every meal until it's gone.
st_aurafina: A shiny green chilli (Food: Green Chilli)
[personal profile] st_aurafina
[personal profile] rydra_wong asked me to link Christmas pudding truffles here, but I was fully sozzled when I wrote that post, so I've made a slightly more coherent version for people who like recipes.

Ingredients:
1 Christmas pudding (or fruit cake or cake of any sort, really) Mine was 600g.
100g-ish of dark chocolate
2 desert spoons of orange flavoured liqueur (I used Cointreau, someone recommended Grand Marnier as tasting less like cough syrup)
A largish amount of dark chocolate for melting and coating... I wish I had weighed this, but the Cointreau bottle was empty by now. Maybe a cup of chocolate buttons? Maybe a bit more?

Method:
Crumble pudding or cake into fine crumbs (you could pulse in a food processor, also)

Sprinkle liqueur over the crumbs and mix.

Melt 100g of chocolate in a bowl over a pan of simmering water, then mix in with crumbs.

Pop the crumbs/chocolate/grog mixture in the fridge to chill for 30 minutes or so.

Shape the crumbs into truffle-sized balls, line them up on a tray lined with baking paper and refrigerate for another 30 minutes or so.

Meanwhile, melt the large and unspecified amount chocolate in double boiler. Use two forks or a truffle baller to dip the balls in the melted chocolate. Tap excess chocolate off, place truffle on tray. Refrigerate batch.

Enjoy tiny Christmas puddings! You can drizzle white chocolate on top to simulate brandy sauce, if you're feeling fancy or if you can melt white chocolate. (This is outside my skillset, unfortunately!)
fish_echo: betta fish (Default)
[personal profile] fish_echo
Slight rambling wrt motivation for cooking with lavender. )

There are two dishes here, the lavender-and-corn and the summer squash. They go rather well together and combine to make a light supper, although if you'd rather have a full meal, I'd suggest adding a nice toasted starch-- ideas I contemplated were: naan, lightly toasted cornbread, a very not-rich biscuit, fresh tortillas, or maybe a simple quesadilla. (Um, yeah, and I also was thinking that a bit of my father's homemade beef jerky would have gone quite well too. Which is clearly not a starch. So, um, let your tummy guide you.)


QUICK DESCRIPTIONS
Recipe 1: Corn with Lavender
A subtle play of flavours in a refreshing summery dish. The warm and soft corn is nicely complimented by the cool and crisp lemon cucumber. It requires a little bit of time and attention during the cooking but isn't inherently difficult.
Recipe 2: A Basic Summer Squash Sauté
Quick, easy, tasty.

Time and serving sizes for making both
1.5 hr-ish
2 people for supper

Photos
I took pictures with my phone, but it's new and I'm having a devil of a time getting it to talk to my computer. Once I get around to figuring that out, I'll update this with pictures. When I do that, I'll drop a quick note to the comm whenever that happens, because I know some people find pictures helpful.


Corn with Lavender )


A basic summer squash sauté )


I'm sorry that this is all very rough and informal! :( If I'm unclear or if you have any questions, drop a comment and I'd be happy to help!

And if you have any suggestions, observations, etc etc, please also drop them in comments!
highlyeccentric: Manly cooking: Bradley James wielding a stick-mixer (Manly cooking)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
Adapted from In the Kitchen, by Melbourne food critics Alan Campion and Michelle Curtis. The book's definitely worth the investment: I've only had it for a couple of months and it's become the Everything Cookbook in the household.

Accessibility and dietary notes. Also, equipment )

Ingredients and method )
jana: [Naruto] Sakura (Default)
[personal profile] jana
Three different recipes that lead to very delicious results if you ask me. Maybe you'll like them too... The recipes behind the cuts are described in text only, if you prefer step-by-step descriptions with lots of images, follow the x-posted link at the bottom of each recipe. Enjoy!

Breakfast bunSpaghetti CarbonaraNettle soup


Breakfast buns )

Spaghetti Carbonara - made in the what-I-had-in-the-fridge way )

Spring-y nettle soup )

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