jjhunter: Watercolor purple ruffled monster with mouthful of raw vegetables looks exceedingly self-pleased (veggie monster)
[personal profile] jjhunter
Cheap, easy, stores well, and can be jazzed up with further additions to vary latter servings - this recipe is one of my fallback staples.

ingredients )

Instructions:
Heat oil in heavy-bottomed pot (you'll need a lid later) and saute onion and garlic until translucent. Add ginger, tumeric and curry powder and saute a few minutes longer. (Can add more oil if necessary.) Add rice and saute for a few more minutes to coat the rice. Add the lentils, stock, raisins, and sunflower seeds, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 25 minutes.

Excellent served with yogurt, or with Waldorf salad.

Extras my mom recommends:
Would be good with butternut squash...roasted in chunks (with parsnips perhaps? ) or bake the squash, scoop it out and whip it with a bit of orange juice and nutmeg. Saute some dark greens (chard, spinach) with olive oil, garlic, pinenuts as a second vegetable.
rosefox: A cheerful chef made out of ginger. (cooking)
[personal profile] rosefox
Tonight I made faux-Moroccan chicken for myself and [personal profile] xtina, based on a Cook's Illustrated recipe that I modified fairly heavily for our various dietary restrictions. It was mild and savory-sweet and delicious. I'll definitely be making this again.

Modifications in case you want to try the original recipe: I used unsalted broth rather than low-sodium, diced raw carrots instead of a can of diced tomatoes, and dates instead of dried apricots. Instead of spicing it up with garam masala I measured in cumin, coriander, and cardamom. I put in half an onion instead of a whole one, and three cloves of garlic rather than four. I left out the suggested 2 Tbsp minced fresh cilantro.

Incidentally, Cook's claims this takes 30 minutes, including prep. They lie. From when I started prep to when I served dinner was almost exactly 1.5 hours. I suppose there are ways I could have been more efficient, but I have a hard time picturing this taking less than an hour.

Soi-disant Moroccan chicken tagine with carrots, chickpeas, and dates )
cougars_catnip: (Default)
[personal profile] cougars_catnip
This is another one I found in Taste of Home

 

Read more... )

rosefox: A cheerful chef made out of ginger. (cooking)
[personal profile] rosefox
Maybe ten years ago, maybe more, I had a bowl of waterzooi at Markt, a Belgian restaurant that at the time was in New York City's Meatpacking District. (It's moved up to Chelsea and they don't have waterzooi on the menu anymore.) It was one of those lifechanging culinary experiences. I eat seafood very rarely; I'd never encountered fish cooked with milk before. The broth was silky, the fish delicate and flaky, the strands of julienned vegetables eminently slurpable. Since then I've had many a creamy chowder, but none came close to the sublime richness of waterzooi, which incorporates both egg yolks and heavy cream (and, in Markt's version, lobster--definitely not traditional, but so delicious!).

On Tuesday we inaugurated our fabulous new blender by making cashew cream (pour boiling water over cashews, soak for one hour, drain, blend with cold water to desired consistency; we blended in a sauteed diced shallot for extra flavor). We made it quite thick and had a lot left over after making a really excellent pasta alfredo, so I'd been thinking about how to use it. Today I mixed some with water, leftover mashed potatoes, nutmeg, and thyme for the best creamy potato soup I've ever had. That made me think of chowder, which made me think of waterzooi. I hunted up a recipe that called for fish (though at some point I must try Julia Child's chicken waterzooi) and we set about adapting it for my dairy-free, low-salt diet.

Ingredients and recipe )

This recipe has a great cooking rhythm. There's just the right amount of time for cubing the fish and chopping the parsley as the vegetables cook, and for loading the dishwasher and separating the eggs as the fish simmers. It smells fantastic while it cooks, and one bowlful is a perfect meal. Even though we used low-sodium broth, it needed just the barest touch of salt to make the flavors pop. The two of us had a serving each, and the third serving is sitting in the fridge, where I suspect the flavors will marry gloriously.

It would be very easy to veganize: no egg yolks, more cashew cream to compensate, veg broth instead of chicken broth, tofu instead of fish. Maybe some day I'll try that. The vegetables could also be varied from the classic mirepoix; as I recall, the dish at Markt had long strands of zucchini and red bell pepper. Lemongrass, ginger, and a dash of hot sauce would give it a lovely Thai flavor, perfect served over rice instead of bread. It's a superbly adaptable recipe. I look forward to playing around with it.
kaberett: A pomegranate, with eyes and mouth drawn onto masking tape and applied (pomegranate)
[personal profile] kaberett
I spend a fair bit of my time at the moment cooking in a group where the dietary restrictions are (1) vegetarian (2) dairy-free (3) gluten-free (4) cane sugar-free.

And, well, cake is nice.

So I took my standard recipe, and we adapted it.

Standard ingredients. )

The modified version goes like this:

300g dark chocolate
200g soya Pure (or other hard or semi-hard fat)
5 eggs
250ml agave syrup
1 tsp vanilla
300g hazelnut meal
pinch of salt
raspberries

Pre-heat oven to 180degC.
Melt chocolate and fat together (either in a heat-proof bowl over simmering water, or in the microwave).
Beat eggs, agave syrup, vanilla (and any booze you want to use) together until thick.
Pour the melted chocolate mixture into the egg mixture and stir thoroughly.
Add the hazelnut flour and the salt and mix thoroughly.
Scatter raspberries liberally across the bottom of your desired baking pan (I tend to go for large rectangular pans, ceramic if I can get them) and stick in the oven for about 30 minutes. If at any point it starts to burn, cover with a sheet of tin foil.

Notes
This was our first attempt at this particular version of the modifications, and next time I'll probably either up the hazelnut meal a little more, or ditch one of the eggs. I'll also be rather more liberal with the vanilla, because the roasted hazelnut flour we used needed a little more of a boost than it ended up getting with these quantities.
Another excellent variant is halving and coring pears, filling the hollow with brown sugar, placing them cut-side-down in the baking tray, and using almond meal & cinnamon/nutmeg/etc in the batter.
delladea: (Default)
[personal profile] delladea
I've been introducing more vegetarian nights into our weekly menus to save some money. I found this coconut lentil soup recipe and modified it based on my tastes and what I had on hand. The result was a yummy, thick curry that my carnivore husband had to have seconds and thirds of. It gets even better after sitting in the 'fridge overnight.

My Modified Recipe )

We ate this with some curried collard greens and gluten-free naan. I highly recommend the yummy bread for dipping, but it's pretty good all by itself too. We got four large servings out of this recipe, enough for dinner last night and for both of us to have it for lunch the next day.
acelightning: shiny purple plate with cartoon flatware (eats03)
[personal profile] acelightning
This is a clear, syrupy caramel sauce which goes well on ice cream, cheesecake, plain cake, filled dessert crepes - almost anything you'd want caramel sauce on, although intensely chocolate things tend to overwhelm it. I call it "double serendipity" because of two "mistakes" I made that turned it from a fairly basic caramel syrup into something with a deep, intriguing flavor.

The first mistake was that I put a dollop of Lyle's Golden Syrup(*) in at the beginning. The cookbook I was looking at had two recipes for caramel sauce, a clear one and one made with cream, and they were on facing pages. The recipes started out the same, but the cream sauce called for golden syrup. When I realized my mistake, I figured it wouldn't make any difference in the end, and it would give it more flavor.

The second mistake I made was to cook the first batch too long; when it cooled, it wasn't spoonable. I had to add more water and boil it some more to get the proper consistency. I had added the flavorings at the end of the first cooking process, which is normal, but they got thoroughly boiled when I re-cooked the mixture. The taste was ambrosial! The second time I made it, I cooked it the right amount of time, and added the liquor and vanilla at the end again... and it was just rum-flavored caramel sauce, tasty enough, but nothing special. Somehow adding the flavorings before the final boiling cooks off the raw alcohol taste and makes everything meld together into a uniquely delicious flavor. (And one of these days I'm going to try adding a bit of sea salt.)
DOUBLE SERENDIPITY CARAMEL SAUCE

1 cup granulated sugar [200 g caster sugar]
1/4 cup [60 ml] water
1 very heaping tablespoonful of Lyle's Golden Syrup(*)
Have ready by the stove:
1 cup [240 ml] very hot water
3 tablespoons [45 ml] dark rum (I use Appleton's Jamaica Rum, which is very flavorful)
1 tablespoon [15 ml] pure vanilla extract

Place the sugar, the smaller amount of water, and the syrup in a heavy saucepan with a capacity of at least 1 quart [1 liter]. Cook and stir over moderately high heat until everything is thoroughly dissolved, then stop stirring and watch it until it turns a deep golden color, but don't let it get too dark or it will start to taste bitter. Remove the pan from the head and slowly and carefully add the larger amonut of water - it will boil up in a great hissing, bubbling fuss. Stir a bit, then add the rum and vanilla, which will probably bubble up a little more. Return the pot to the stove, reduce the heat a little, and stir until everything is dissolved again. Bring it back to the boil and stop stirring. Boil it until it has reduced to 1 cup [240 ml] in volume; I periodically pour it into the heatproof cup I measured the water in, and then pour it back into the pan if it needs to cook more. When it's done, let it cool in the heatproof cup until it's just warm, then pour it into a jar with a lid. Store, covered, at room temperature. (If your room is chilly, after a couple of days the syrup may start to form crystals around the edges; if they bother you, reheat it gently while stirring.)

(*) Lyle's Golden Syrup is a British product that is now found in many US supermarkets. It's "refiner's syrup", the thick, golden, slightly brown-sugar flavored syrup that's left at the end of the sugar-refining process. It not only adds color and flavor, it helps prevent candies and sauces from crystallizing.
delladea: (Default)
[personal profile] delladea
Greens are some of my favorite veggies, and this is our family unit's favorite way of cooking collard greens. These go perfectly with a pot of black-eyed peas and a pan of cornbread, or put them with chili, fish, chicken... really anything except for Chinese or Thai takeout leftovers.

On to the recipe! )

Cooked collard greens keep a few days in the fridge, and IMO are better the next day. You can also slice the collard greens ahead of time if you plan on cooking them later in the day.
fish_echo: betta fish (Default)
[personal profile] fish_echo
Slight rambling wrt motivation for cooking with lavender. )

There are two dishes here, the lavender-and-corn and the summer squash. They go rather well together and combine to make a light supper, although if you'd rather have a full meal, I'd suggest adding a nice toasted starch-- ideas I contemplated were: naan, lightly toasted cornbread, a very not-rich biscuit, fresh tortillas, or maybe a simple quesadilla. (Um, yeah, and I also was thinking that a bit of my father's homemade beef jerky would have gone quite well too. Which is clearly not a starch. So, um, let your tummy guide you.)


QUICK DESCRIPTIONS
Recipe 1: Corn with Lavender
A subtle play of flavours in a refreshing summery dish. The warm and soft corn is nicely complimented by the cool and crisp lemon cucumber. It requires a little bit of time and attention during the cooking but isn't inherently difficult.
Recipe 2: A Basic Summer Squash Sauté
Quick, easy, tasty.

Time and serving sizes for making both
1.5 hr-ish
2 people for supper

Photos
I took pictures with my phone, but it's new and I'm having a devil of a time getting it to talk to my computer. Once I get around to figuring that out, I'll update this with pictures. When I do that, I'll drop a quick note to the comm whenever that happens, because I know some people find pictures helpful.


Corn with Lavender )


A basic summer squash sauté )


I'm sorry that this is all very rough and informal! :( If I'm unclear or if you have any questions, drop a comment and I'd be happy to help!

And if you have any suggestions, observations, etc etc, please also drop them in comments!
highlyeccentric: Manly cooking: Bradley James wielding a stick-mixer (Manly cooking)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
Adapted from In the Kitchen, by Melbourne food critics Alan Campion and Michelle Curtis. The book's definitely worth the investment: I've only had it for a couple of months and it's become the Everything Cookbook in the household.

Accessibility and dietary notes. Also, equipment )

Ingredients and method )
juleself: (autumn)
[personal profile] juleself
This is one of my most favorite cakes ever, perfect for when autumn rolls around. And it's delicious if you love oranges. Plus it's gluten- and lactose-free!

Orange and almond cake )

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