monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
I made what I consider a delicious batch of vegetarian friend rice for supper tonight, and since I was writing it up anyway in the hope of being able to reproduce it in the future, I thought I'd share it here as well.

Dietary note: I made this with egg, so it's not vegan, but it would probably be pretty tasty without egg, with extra cabbage, or with some crumbled tofu.

Accessibility note: This dish involves several preparation steps including pre-cooking the rice and pre-making the sauce. It also requires chopping (although you could use pre-chopped or grated carrots and pre-shredded cabbage to cut down on that) and ten to fifteen minutes of standing over a hot wok or skillet stirring.

The sauce I used come from my favorite cookbook, Audrey Alsterburg and Wanda Urbanowicz, ReBar Modern Food Cookbook, and it's great for general stir-fry purposes too. Here's the recipe:

Soy Chile Sauce )

Here's the recipe for the rice:

Vegetarian Fried Rice )
monksandbones: A photo of the top of a purple kohlrabi, with a backlit green leaf growing from it (veggie love now with more kohlrabi)
[personal profile] monksandbones
This is my go-to winter soup recipe and my go-to vegetable soup recipe. It's the product of a slow evolution from this recipe in the March 2009 issue of Canadian Living: Hearty Vegetable Soup, which I've gradually modified to my liking. It's a pretty flexible recipe, actually, built on a foundation of tomato, onion, garlic, cumin, cinnamon, and oregano. Feel free to use the root vegetables and legumes of your choice! Likewise, it can be scaled up or down. I usually make it in my 10-litre soup pot, which the full recipe fills about halfway, but I've also made it in a tiny, 1-litre pot!

It's vegetarian (and indeed, vegan), and forms its own delicious broth as it cooks, so there's no need for pre-made stock or broth. It does, however, require some significant chopping and stirring.

Ingredients (in Imperial and Metric volume units) )
Directions )

The original recipe suggests serving the soup with sour cream, which would undoubtedly be tasty, but it's equally tasty on its own. It also makes excellent leftovers - its flavor improves once it's been sitting for a while.
cheyinka: A sketch of a Metroid (Default)
[personal profile] cheyinka

Southern Living magazine had a no-cook issue that had a great recipe for summer rolls with peach slices and barbeque pork. They were delicious, but also a lot of work - they were intended for a party, where you'd make one for each guest and then your guests would make the rest themselves, so making them for my husband and son and I was, as I said, a lot of work. So instead I decided to make the recipe as a salad!

ingredients ) directions )
peaceful_sands: butterfly (Default)
[personal profile] peaceful_sands
So I was serving quiche for dinner this evening and decided to make some coleslaw to go with it. It's ages since I've made coleslaw myself despite the fact that I far prefer it to the shop bought stuff which, for my taste, is always far too drippy and smothered with way too much mayonnaise.

I thought I would share my pseudo-coleslaw with you and see if anyone has any suggestions for the next batch. I've not included quantities because it's basically an 'as much as you feel like' kind of recipe - nothing is going to go drastically wrong if you use different quantities.

My ingredients

White cabbage
Red onion
Raw mushroom
Carrots (I picked some Chantenay ones which are supposed to be a little sweeter than the average)
Dried apricots
Mayonnaise

I diced everything (except the mayonnaise!) threw it in a bowl and mixed it up and then added enough mayo to coat but not drown the veg. And the nice thing is there's enough to go on lunch tomorrow. Today I didn't add them, but I also sometimes throw in a few chopped fresh chives.

I like adding the apricots for just that occasional bite of something a little sweeter. I know the shop bought ones sometimes include pineapple or sultanas, which is what made me begin to think about what else could go in. So does anyone have any other suggestions of things that they add to coleslaw for just that hint of unusual.
toft: graphic design for the moon europa (piepiepie)
[personal profile] toft
Today I ate salmon with balsamic-and-ginger sauce, homemade fries, and coleslaw!

Salmon with Balsamic and Ginger Sauce )

I've found that the trick for really good homemade fries is to *fry* on medium heat them rather than bake them, ie. in a frying pan with cooking oil, but after browning both sides, turn the heat down and cover.

Now: more cooking! I'm going to a second thanksgiving tomorrow, so I have to make my mum's cabbage dish again. My mum's red cabbage is delicious. )

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